FOOD FUTURE

undefined perfection

 

 

Luiz, Olga and Natalia are three design students finishing their Master studies in Germany. "Undefined Perfection" is a design fiction project that we find particularly interesting. 

 

 

"What kind of food rituals could emerge in a world where naturally grown foods become hardly available? How would the function of a banana change if it was too precious to be eaten?
 
It is predicted that population growth will lead to severe food shortages in the near future. Natural foods might be replaced by synthetic 'superfoods' to feed the masses. We imagine these superfoods to have no taste, no visual attraction, no smell, no sound and no texture. Eating in a world where food is rare will be reduced to an intake of artificial nutrients, neglecting our five senses.

Yet, we know that food has always had an important social function: We share and experience food with the family, with friends and in religious rituals. When societies, believe systems and technologies change, our food rituals change as well.
 
For a world where eating is based on the mere intake of nutrients, we imagine naturally grown foods to acquire a higher value. New food rituals will allow to experience food again with all five humans senses. This way we are attempting to achieve inner perfection which is the basic drive that makes us humans."
 
A project by Olga Michel Chico (MEX), Luiz Gustavo Neiva Lara (BR), Natalia Lazarshivili (GE).
 
Contact


 

 


FOOD FUTURE

miss kō

Miss KO

 

Along the very fashionable Avenue George V, in Paris, at the epicenter of the Golden Triangle, Philippe Stark has created Miss Kō. The place looks like a video game, an immersive world in which every detail recounts the story of an imaginary heroine, Miss Kō - an Eurasian who has travelled extensively. She is bewitching and sensual, revealing herself with a body entirely covered in tattoos beautifully created by Horikitsune, the only European to have trained as an apprentice in the traditional Japanese art of Irezumi. Miss Kō is branded by the British firm GBH who created a simple logotype made with nine grains of rice representing the Asian countries which inspired the creation of the Miss Kō menu.

 

Miss Kō is a mystery, a dream, feverish, crazy and strange. This fantasy created from scratch by Stark and his team is a crazy collage inspired by Blade Runner. The vision is a globalized future in which Asia is the new centre of gravity. Like an alley, stretched across 500 m2 of space, leading to the spectacle of a frenetic / noisy place with a massive screen bar and a spectacular fresco by David Rochline. Lush and fantastic, the monumental fresco - 15 m long-  is poetic and looks like a futuristic manga, a real visual curiosity.

 

One of Miss Kō's most unusual and hypnotizing features is a 26 m long double bar running the length of the restaurant entirely made from hundred of monitors broadcasting Asian channels, punctuated by the fluid passage of a dragon designed by Label Dalbin. The furnishings are a balanced mix of contemporary items and Far East inspiration.

Jean-Philippe Bourdon, the talented lighting designer uses neon to erase the notion of a ceiling and spotlights the focal points of the staging. The result is rich, smooth and colorful. Orsten Karki designed  Miss Kō 's original soundtrack. An Asian fusion food re-mix & re- twist  : sushi, jiaozi, bo buns, spring rolls and yakitori always served with contrasting flavours and textures. Sashizzas, one the house's specialties are an hybrid pairing Japanese pizzetas and tuna sashimi and it tastes great !

 

For Philippe Stark “Miss Kō is a place of freedom, humor, creativity, art, friendliness, openness. Miss Kō is a breath of madness, it’s truly insane. A street out of Blade Runner: a cement parking-garage wall with Formica chairs, TV screens that spew out hundreds of images of live news coverage from Asia, a kitchen that smokes and smoulders.”

 

Miss Kō is an object of curiosity, from the décor to the menu, everything is designed and well done in its Asia+ Blade Runner + Entertainment Style. Miss Kō fascinates, if you are in Paris don't miss the show !

 

Cecile Poignant

 

Miss Kō

 

GBH 

 

Horikitsune

 

 

MissKo

MissKo

MissKo

MissKo

MissKo

MissKo

 


FOOD FUTURE

sensorial stimuli

Tableware-as-sensorial-stimuli-a-Jinhyun-Jeon

 

A return to primal and intense experiences is brewing in the world of art and design. It is clear that we are searching for multi-sensory and experiential stimuli which give us something all-encompassing and rich, rather than the mundane tasks of our daily lives. The rise of synaesthetic projects is evidence of this desire.

 

The work of Jinhyun Jeon is inspired by such a desire. As a recent graduate from the Design Academy Eindhoven, Jeon created a project entitled 'Tableware as Sensorial Stimuli,' seeking to infuse the daily ritual of eating with the phenomenon of synaesthesia. The project is a set of cutlery in which each piece is designed to engage more senses than simply taste, through a combination of temperature, color, texture, volume, and form.

 

"The tableware we use for eating should not just be a tool for placing food in our mouth," writes Jeon, "but it should become extensions of our body, challenging our senses even in the moment when the food is still on its way to being consumed."

By exploring synaesthesia through design, the artist hopes to enhance the role of tableware and cutlery, and to enrich the experience of eating by cross-wiring and activating multiple senses.

 

In the end, the project serves to create a more conscientious and joyful relationship with food, that satiates our primal desires for feeling and experience.

 

Text by Ryan Moritz

 

jjhyun.com

 

 

 

Tableware as sensorial stimuli Jinhyun Jeon

 

Tableware as sensorial stimuli Jinhyun Jeon

 

Tableware as sensorial stimuli Jinhyun Jeon

 

Tableware as sensorial stimuli Jinhyun Jeon

Tableware as sensorial stimuli Jinhyun Jeon


FOOD FUTURE

mobile hospitality

 

mobile hospitality

photo courtesy of mobile hospitality

 

Ania and Maciej are polish architects and designers, last year the duo was commissioned to realize a project in a public space for the festival ArtDesign Feldkirch. Their Mobile Gastfreundschaft is based on responsibility and self-initiative in public space, combining food and community in a spontaneous and transitory setting.

 

The project consists of a wheelbarrow kitchen, ten folding stools, and large table at which passers-by are invited to enjoy a meal with friends and strangers. Expressing a formal language of DIY aesthetics, the wood structures are easily transportable from one public space to the next.

The duo met during their studies in Gdansk, Poland, and imbedded the project with the cultural importance of food and togetherness. An aim for the design process was to bring a smile to people passing by and to offer an interactive experience where design meets delight.

 

Text by Ryan Moritz

 

 

chmararosinke.com

 

 

mobile hospitality

photo courtesy of mobile hospitality

 

mobile hospitality

photo courtesy of mobile hospitality

 

mobile hospitality

photo courtesy of mobile hospitality

 

mobile hospitality

photo courtesy of mobile hospitality


FOOD FUTURE

nomadic café

 

Couleurs Café by Arnaud Viratelle

Couleurs Café by Arnaud Viratelle

 

Imagine freshly roasted coffee, hand-brewed in a little stand behind a bicycle, parked outside the Metro station in Paris. This is the image of Arnaud Viratelle's Couleurs Café.

 

What we find so attractive about Couleurs Café is Arnaud's commitment to providing quality, on-the-go coffee, while foraging on a new path for streetfood in Paris. While foodtrucks have long been a part of the urban fabric in cities across the world, the movement is just gaining traction in Paris with already well known establishments like "Le Camion à Glaces - Glazed " and "Le Camion Qui Fume." The renowned french chef Thierry Marx has even begun a school for street food. The concept of Couleurs Café, however, is more convivial and allows for a personal exchange of conversation and education. According to Arnaud, the idea came to him after trips to India, Thailand, and Peru.

His customers love the cafe espresso, simple and effective. Every day is different and brings curious newcomers, but the unique exchange keep loyal followers coming back.

 

Arnaud believes there to be a demand for streetfood in Paris and will provide an example for future successes.

 

Noémie Devime & Ryan Moritz

 

Couleurs Café on Facebook

 

 

photos by noémie devime

Couleurs Café photos by noémie devime


FOOD FUTURE

a multi-sensory experience

 

photo by Dominic Davies

photo by Dominic Davies

 

 

There exists a burgeoning trend for multi-sensory experiences. No matter the form, structure, or venue, the goal is to heighten our awareness of the links between the 5 senses. While each sense is distinct, when all 5 are activated and ensemble an experience can become extraordinary.

 

Beginning today in London and running through the 14th of October is the global premiere of Sean Rogg's the Waldorf Project. Conceived and directed by the British artist, the production traverses genres to unite theatrical performance, visual art, choreography, design, electronic music, and gastronomy. Six collaborators, each chosen for their take on the theme - the Japanese muskmelon - have come together to create a pan-sensory experience.

 

Among the collaborators is Gina Geoghegan, Set Design, who will transform the Netil House into an immersive environment in addition to Sound Design by sound artists Alessio Natalizia and Sam Willis. Andrew Stellitano and Blanch & Shock, Food Design, have developed a 6 course menu which will be presented to guests by choreographed dancers by Movement Director Imogen Night.

Sean Rogg explains: "The aim of the Waldorf Project is to create a completely new dining experience through the most fully immersive multi-sensory performance possible. This inaugural event, which we have called 'Chapter One / Muskmelon,' is fundamentally themed around the metaphor of the Japanese muskmelon, which is an incredibly rare and sough-after fruit representing a faultless synergy between man and nature."

 

Ryan Moritz

 

 

www.waldorfproject.com

 

www.astarism.co.uk

 

blanchandshock.com

 

 

photo by Andrew Stellitano

photo by Andrew Stellitano

 

photo by Dominic Davies

photo by Dominic Davies

 

Courtesy Blanch and Shock

Courtesy Blanch and Shock

 

photo by Dominic Davies

photo by Dominic Davies

 

 

 


FOOD FUTURE

the dumpling diva

 

photo by marja samsom

photo by marja samsom

 

 

Marja Samsom, based in New York, is a well known passionate actor in the "Food World" she creates unexpected recipes, does catering for special events and organizes "underground" dinners.

 

She is the famous owner of a small sake-and-dumpling empire: the Kithchenclub & Chibi's Bar: celebrated it's 20 anniversary, then closed it's doors and opening a whole new world of opportunities!

 

Since then Marja has been making a name as "The Dumpling Diva" through her catering business, TV appearances and cooking classes.

 

To celebrate the end of  summer, we would like to share with you one of Marja's last recipe: "Sunflower Salad", an unexpected polysensorial yellow experience.

A simple and gorgeous recipe, mainly made of sunflowers and chrysanthemum, a "gift of nature". The sunflower seeds are toasted, the buttery and petals are tossed with chrysanthemum leaves, all drizzled with light vinaigrette.

 

Eating sunflowers will allow you to enjoy the strong power of yellow !

 

Noémie Devime

 

Click to listen to Marja's recipe

 

Marja's website

 

 

Summer Sunflower Salad : photo by Marja Samsom

Summer Sunflower Salad - photo by Marja Samsom


FOOD FUTURE

sensory revolution

"the taste of rage" photo by leslie kee - FA magazine

"the taste of rage" photo by leslie kee - FA magazine

 

 

In one second a taste or a smell can bring back emotions and memories to us. We remember so much more than what was served; who we were with, the environment, in which mood we were in...  As children our parents told us to not play with food. The japanese food creator Ayako Suwa violates the rule and takes it to another level. She challenges the "normal" dinner situation and  gives us a whole new experience in how to eat and how it can make us feel.

 

After graduating from Kanazawa College of Art, Ayako started Food Creation in 2006. Her first exhibition, "sensuous food, emotional taste", was held two years later at 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa. Ayako created the edible art works by a combination of complicated ingredients trying to express various feelings and emotions of human beings. The exhibition was a great success and since then, Ayako has travelled the world making performances, exhibitions and guerrilla restaurants.

Basically we eat just to satisfy hunger or to enjoy a taste but Ayako values the whole dining situation; when and wherewe eat. She gives her dinner participants a new perspective on eating. Food Creation treat food as the ultimate communication tool and it is "appetite" that leads to the visual expressions.The theme "The concept reaches your stomach" was created and on Food Creation's dinner events Ayako sets up the situation associated with the "eating". It gives the guest a deeper experience as the concept is spread both through the taste and the sense. In its approach, food gains a new value that is not gastronomy nor a nutrient nor an energy source. At a dinner, open your senses and hold the feeling to your next dinner party, and next, and next...

 

Bon Appétit!

 

Sofie Broden

 

foodcreation

 

 

 

"the taste of le blanc" Montblanc dinner party @tabloid tokyo

"the taste of le blanc" Montblanc dinner party @tabloid tokyo

"111 flavours to savour" @TripleOne Somerset Singapore

"111 flavours to savour" @TripleOne Somerset Singapore

 

"111 flavours to savour" @TripleOne Somerset Singapore

"111 flavours to savour" @TripleOne Somerset Singapore

 

"sensuous food, emotional taste" photo by hiroshi iwasaki  Numero Tokyo

"sensuous food, emotional taste" photo by hiroshi iwasaki Numero Tokyo

 

"sensuous food, emotional taste" photo by hiroshi iwasaki  Numero Tokyo

"sensuous food, emotional taste" photo by hiroshi iwasaki Numero Tokyo

 

"sensuous food, emotional taste" photo by hiroshi iwasaki  Numero Tokyo

"sensuous food, emotional taste" photo by hiroshi iwasaki Numero Tokyo

 


FOOD FUTURE

Hel Yes!

photo by aleksi niemelä - art direction by mia wallenius

photo by aleksi niemelä - art direction by mia wallenius

 

Hel Yes! is a temporary restaurant and exhibition imagined and realized by a creative team of Finnish designers and food visionaries. It is commissioned by the Finnish Institute in London and the first event took place during The London Design Festival 2010.

 

Antto Melasniemi is the Executive Chef and Concept Director of Hel Yes! He leads his team in a straightforward and simple style of cooking, "It is all about the delicacies of primitive Finnish cuisine, which is typically more about pure ingredients than, for example, restaurant culture", says Melasniemi. Hel Yes! serve their dinners on porcelain and glassware from both classic Finnish design houses like Artek and Ittala and smaller design companies, Saas Instruments and Nikari. The clothes and looks on waiters are created by fashion designer Heikki Salonen.

 

After the great success in London, Hel Yes! travelled back to its roots and in early 2011 they opened a restaurant during 13 days in Helsinki's Kalasatama. In the dark and freezing winter this concept brought warmth and atmospheric hospitality into the old vegetable warehouse where the dinner experience took place.

The Hel Yes! experiences differ from each other as the creative team constantly explore new concepts and bring in different partners. In February 2011the tour went on to Stockholm and Eric Ericssonhallen in Skeppsholmskyrkan. They offered an experimental social gathering that combined gastronomy, design and dance. Artist Maria Duncker brought her Bone Orchestra and Helsinki Dance Company performed numbers choreographed by Kenneth Kvarnström.

 

Get your own Hel Yes! experience later this year when the team executes an event in London between the 18th of September - 2nd of October.

 

Sofie Brodén

 

helyes.fi

 

finnish-institute.org.uk

 

heikkisalonen.com

 

 

left : photo by aleksi niemelä right: photo by adam laycock

left - photo by aleksi niemelä - right - photo by adam laycock

 

photos by aleksi niemelä

photos by aleksi niemelä

 

 

in London : photo by adam laycock

in London : photo by adam laycock

 

in London photo by adam laycock

in London photo by adam laycock

 

in London photo by adam laycock

in London photo by adam laycock

 


FOOD FUTURE

black delight

 

photo courtesy of lakrids

photo courtesy of lakrids

 

Since ancient times, in Southern Europe and Asia, licorice's roots had been used in pharmacy for their benefit in many medicinal recipes. As times are changing, we are looking for new tastes and sensations; ready to bring in our kitchen traditional medicinal plants.

 

A recent brand founded by Johan Bülow a young, good looking danish entrepreneur is named "Lakrids" which means licorice in danish. Johan used to work in the advertising world, tired of this constant stress he decided to quit everything to focus on what he loves the most: licorice. His brand is only focused on this unique ingredient to offer it a real upscale: gourmet and gastronomic.The licorice is cultivated during 3 to 5 years on the island of Bornholm in Denmark before being harvested. The products are manufactured traditionally and hand-rolled.

Lakrid's products are a mix between a chosen ingredient coming from faraway countries and a danish ingredient.The choice of tastes and consistencies is wide: from hard to soft, sharp to sweet, chewy to crispy, but also spicy. With this large "palette" the chefs no longer use licorice only in desserts, they also use it to add flavor to a salad or a salted sauce. All products are numbered and colored by a graphic and modern approach. Easy to remember like your fetish number!

 

To eat black food is something unusual and weird, it's linked with the idea of something forbidden or with magical food… probably some of the reasons why we are so fan of licorice!

 

www.lakrids.nu

 

photo courtesy of lakrids

photo courtesy of lakrids

 

photo courtesy of lakrids

photo courtesy of lakrids

 

photo courtesy of lakrids

photo courtesy of lakrids

 

 

 

 

 


FOOD FUTURE

eating & design

 

James King - The MRI Steak

James King - The MRI Steak

To better understand how designers can help humanity to make the changes to its food chain that will be necessary in the future, Premsela, the Netherlands institute for Design and Fashion has organized "Food Cultures : Eating by Design". This exhibition curated by the designer Marije Vogelzang, is at the Designhuis in Eindhoven, Nederland.

 

Vogelzang calls herself an “eating designer". Her work focuses on the activity of eating, its cultural background and the emotions around it. Over the past 12 years, she's opened two Proef restaurants, written the book Eat Love, and designed dinners and workshops. Vogelzang has invited the curator and artist Koos Flinterman to select works of art for inclusion in Food Culture.

 

This great exhibition shows the wide perspective and importance of food as a design subject. Highly inspirational, emotional and multi sensorial, the show includes twenty projects from a range of international designers, photojournalists and artists.

 

Trendtablet managed to catch Marije whose schedule is more than full, to asked her to answer a part of the Proust Questionnaire:

 

Your favorite virtue ?

Curiosity.

 

The main feature of your character ?

Positivity and fantasy.

 

Your favorite qualities in a person?

Humor and openness.

 

Your favorite occupation ?

Dreaming, playing, talking, eating, drinking.

 

Your idea of happiness ?

Having eye contact with your child, diving inside the eye and understand love without words.

 

Your favorite colour and flower ?

I am more interested in colour combinations than single colours. I don't have one favorite. My favorite flower must be edible. Maybe the elderflower.

If not yourself, who would you be? 

I often dream that I am a man. If I was a man i would have a beard and groom it.

 

Where would you like to live? 

In a cave on top of an underground hot spring where small creatures live that change color and shape according to what you think of.

 

Your favorite heroes in real life ?

My mother, Li Edelkoort, Nelson Mandela, Pippi Longstocking (the non-fictional one).

 

Your favorite heroes in fiction ?

Sophie (Roald Dahl).

 

Your favorite food and drink? 

Something that combines sour and spicy with a touch of sweet and fresh herbs.

 

What you hate most of all ?

I hate and don't understand sexual child abuse.

 

Your favorite words ?

Possibly.

 

What is your present state of mind ?

In curiosity 2.0. Recovering from business betrayal to eventually bloom brighter, lighter and stronger.

 

For what fault have you most toleration? 

Indulgence!

 

Your favorite motto ?

Crisis feeds creativity.

 

 

www.marijevogelzang.nl

 

 

designhuis.nl

 

 

Marre Moerel - Food on Table

Marre Moerel - Food on Table

 

Stummerer/ Hablesreiter/ Koeb

Stummerer/ Hablesreiter/ Koeb

 

Artúr van Balen – Sainsbury Chickens

Artúr van Balen – Sainsbury Chickens

 

© Scholten & Baijings 2009 - Stitched Vegetables, photography Yves Krol

© Scholten & Baijings 2009 - Stitched Vegetables, photography Yves Krol

 

 Arabeschi di Latte, photography Lizzy Kalisvaart

Arabeschi di Latte, photography Lizzy Kalisvaart

 

GGlab, photography Lizzy Kalisvaart

GGlab, photography Lizzy Kalisvaart


FOOD FUTURE

take away

photos by jean-françois mallet

photos by jean-françois mallet

 

Tell me what you eat ...

 

Bretzel in New York, Dim Sum in Hong Kong , Acarajé from Bahia, the street food with very few expresses the best of a culture.

What is common between shortbread iced with sugar, a calzone pizza with peppers, fried fish dumplings with coriander? The street. "Earthly food" seen by Jean-Francois Mallet can be eaten directly at the asphalt.

 

From Tokyo to Buenos Aires via Hanoi, India, Armenia, Mali and New York, the belly of the earth unfolds on the sidewalks of the world. Why the streets? The question is not the good one. At the restaurant or on a bench, Jean-Francois Mallet focuses on the diversity of flavors and on the authenticity of recipes.

 

But it is often in the street that cultures are reflected in their tastiest expression. Cooking is a mode of apprehension and understanding of other's flavors and taste. The bias is aesthetic and ideological. The angle never shows misery or dirt. Yes, you can be happy in the streets,you just need a seat.

 

Street foods seen by Jean-Francois Mallet are always attractive. To be photographed, it is necessary that the dishes are good, only then they can be beautiful. "I always taste before taking a picture," says chef-photographer-reporter.

 

His photographic work is against globalization, turning its back on large restaurant chains that bloom on every continent. So why the street? Because it is where the struggle for a better world , within the meaning of the word gourmet is.

 

text by Emmanuelle Jary

 

 

www.malletphoto.com

 

Buy "Take away" by Jean-François Mallet

 

 photos by jean-françois mallet

photos by jean-françois mallet

 

 photos by jean-françois mallet

photos by jean-françois mallet

 photos by jean-françois mallet

photos by jean-françois mallet

 

 photos by jean-françois mallet

photos by jean-françois mallet

 

 photos by jean-françois mallet

photos by jean-françois mallet

 

 

 

 photos by jean-françois mallet

photos by jean-françois mallet

 

photos by jean-françois mallet

photos by jean-françois mallet

 

photos by jean-françois mallet

photos by jean-françois mallet

 

 

photos by jean-françois mallet

photos by jean-françois mallet

 

photos by jean-françois mallet

photos by jean-françois mallet

 

photos by jean-françois mallet

photos by jean-françois mallet

 

photos by jean-françois mallet

photos by jean-françois mallet

 

photos by jean-françois mallet

photos by jean-françois mallet

photos by jean-françois mallet

photos by jean-françois mallet

 

photos by jean-françois mallet

photos by jean-françois mallet

 

photos by jean-françois mallet

photos by jean-françois mallet

 

photos by jean-françois mallet

photos by jean-françois mallet

 

photos by jean-françois mallet

photos by jean-françois mallet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



FOOD FUTURE

un caffé, per favore!

 

 

cappuccino by sara rosso

cappuccino photo by sara rosso

 

Coffee connoisseur, Sara Rosso is on the trail of what you might call, “slow coffee.” Her book, How to Order an Italian Coffee, features beautiful photographs as well as descriptions of the different varieties of coffee in Italy. Rosso writes that coffee has achieved iconic stature in Italy, part and parcel of Italian identity. She also includes a pronunciation guide, tips for understanding the coffee bar culture in Italy, as well as instructions for how to make coffee at home like one of the locals.

 

Rosso’s book provides a much needed escape from the land of calorie-packed and artificially-sweetened frappucinos. Starbuck’s itself, has taken note of this new trend and has launched a series of espresso tastings in Paris. Slow-drip coffee, indeed!
Ever curious about the future of food and drink, Trend Tablet caught up with Sara Rosso for an exclusive interview. Join us in discovering what makes Sara tick and what to expect next from world of coffee! Text by Beth Lauck.
What inspired you to move to Italy and to write about your adventures with coffee?

Here's a little confession: when I moved to Italy 9 years ago, I wasn't a coffee drinker at all, neither espresso nor American coffee.But coffee is a very social thing in Italy and I found myself getting the occasional cappuccino with friends and colleagues, and it took a few years before I started drinking coffee every day. It's the cornerstone to my morning now.

 

 

Before moving to Italy, you lived in the United States. What can we expect from Italian coffee that we wont find stateside?

That's exactly why I wrote the book, How to Order an Italian Coffee in Italy. I think coffee culture in America has its own flavor, but in Italy, the great thing about it is it's pretty consistent everywhere you go. That's what traditional means, really: that there are certain expectations, rituals, and guidelines which are followed. There's some innovation in coffee culture in Italy but you won't find people walking around with a thermos full of coffee drinks that are supposed to last all morning. The only time you'll see a coffee to-go is when someone is delivering that coffee to someone to be consumed immediately.

 

 

Are there different kinds of coffees for different times of the day in Italy?

It depends on the drinker, but most Italians prefer to drink milk in their coffee mainly in the mornings. They order a cappuccino or make caffè latte (milk and coffee) at home, and will drink an espresso mid-morning and/or directly following lunch. You'll never see an Italian drinking coffee during a meal that isn't breakfast.

What is your favorite type of Italian coffee and why?

I started with the marocchino (sometimes called espressino) which is like a little cappuccino (espresso + foamed milk) served in a glass cup with a little cacao powder. Now I drink a simple espresso in the morning, every morning. If you want to really know if coffee is good, try drinking it black. Sugar and milk often hide the imperfections of an average or bad coffee. If you can drink coffee with no decoration, you'll know if it's a good blend or not. Also, since the espresso is supposed to be consumed immediately upon serving, it shouldn't be too hot, either.

 

 

How do you see the future of coffee unfolding?

I think the progression will move from those who have been handed an experience (in Italy, in a coffee shop) to experimenting themselves and trying to own more of the experience from start to finish. People will start making more and more coffee at home which will be close to bar quality, whether it's hand pressed or actually investing in the expensive equipment. I still get my coffee in a bar every day because I like the ritual and the social experience. There's something about depending on a person to deliver the kickstart to your morning, and I
share that waking moment with the people around me. Walking into the fresh air for a few moments afterward also helps compound that post-coffee high.

 

 

The slow food movement has been gaining momentum for the last two decades. Is there such a thing as “slow coffee,” and where are we most likely to find it?

The Slow Food movement was actually born in Italy, so it's not surprising to think that coffee would also have a similar movement here. But I think the Slow Coffee movement is actually the reverse - it's moving away from these giant milky sugary drinks and stripping coffee down to its traditional (in this case, Italian) simplicity. It takes less than half a minute from ordering to delivering the espresso so you can drink it. Many Italians like to go to torrefazioni, coffee shops which roast and grind their own coffee beans, which I think is a step closer to knowing where your beans come from.

 

 

Buy your copy of «How to Order an Italian Coffee»

 

 

Sara's food & travel site

 

 

coretto by sara rosso

coretto photo by sara rosso


FOOD FUTURE

dinner series

 

james victore

photo courtesy james victore

 

James Victore is a New York-based art director who says he “strives to make work that is sexy, strong and memorable”. His freestyle graphics and evocative designs inspire honest and immediate reactions from his audience, expanding the perception of what good graphic design has the power to achieve. Interested in engaging both the public and his peers with his work, Victore has started a unique experience for a small group of guests in his Dinner Series. Through the federating power of good food and creative conversation, these intimate events open up dialogue between groups of people who may not otherwise have met.

 

“Last year I started a workshop called the Dinner Series. My goal was to invite a small group of curious and energetic designers, writers, ad and creative-types to give them a total immersion into the way we in my studio work and think— about life, work, family, and creativity. We worked this brave group hard, this was the formula: 5 days in my Brooklyn studio with me, 5 evenings at a private restaurant in TriBeCa with a private chef and a special guest luminary designer, artist or film maker.

I thought this was a fun little idea—it turned out to be a huge life-changing idea. Not only did our family of participants gain new perspectives on concept, connecting with clients, and new tools for idea generation and expression, but they ALSO left with a completely renewed sense of self– a reclamation of their creativity, game-changing plans on how to balance work life and family, kickass ways to conquer fear and self-doubt, and a sense of empowerment and how to make a bigger difference in themselves and the world around them.

We realized that by creating this intimate little family, we were at the precipice of a burgeoning revolution. A new movement illuminating the individual.”

 

In 2012, James Victore is planning two sessions for the Dinner Series.

 

Find out more information 

www.jamesvictore.com

 

 

James Victore

photos courtesy james victore


FOOD FUTURE

food for thought

 

conflictkitchen

Photo by conflictkitchen


The future of food is complicated. And Conflict Kitchen is counting on it.

 

Based in Pittburgh, PA and open seven days a week, Conflict Kitchen is a take-out style restaurant that only serves food from countries in conflict with the United States. Its mission is to complicate pre-existing social relations between food and economic exchange; to engage the general public in discussions about countries, cultures, and people they may know little about; and to establish greater cultural diversity.

 

The Kitchen is currently serving Venezuelan cuisine. Developed in collaboration with the members of the Venezuelan community, food comes packaged in custom-designed wrappers that highlight interviews with Venezuelans both in Venezuela and the United States.

Issues discussed include the relationship between street food and popular culture as well as conversations about President Hugo Chavez and the geopolitical dynamics of the region.

 

Conflict Kitchen features a new country/cuisine every six months. In addition, each culinary iteration is complimented by events, performances, and discussions. Thus far, the Kitchen has hosted international Skype dinner parties between citizens of Pittsburgh and young professionals in Tehran, Iran; documentary filmmakers in Kabul, Afghanistan; and community radio activists in Caracas, Venezuela.

Upcoming cuisines/countries include Cuba and North Korea.

 

Subject & text by Beth Lauck.

 

 

www.conflictkitchen.org

 

 

conflictkitchen

photo by conflictkitchen

 

conflictkitchen

photo by conflictkitchen

 

conflictkitchen

photo by conflictkitchen


FOOD FUTURE

"Bistro de l'hôtel"

 

Johan Björklund at "Bistro de l'hôtel" in Beaune France

Johan Björklund at work in "Bistro de l'hôtel" Beaune- France

My father Johan Björklund started his professional career as a  swedish chef in Paris, he then  feel for the wine industry and finally 3 years ago he opened his restaurant " Bistro de l'hôtel" that brings simple but excellent food and has an exquisite wine list.

The reason i wanted to share this restaurant with you is beacuse i truly feel that's what we are all aiming for, something cosy, good but simple.

Six years ago, Lidewij Edelkoort forecasted the We are Family trend, this one explained and showed that we would be closer to our friends, our family, our colleagues,  we would be less independent and work more as a team.

 The step towards this trend was probably food, it brought people together and made them share culture and variety.The Bistro de l'hôtel is a restaurant in Burgundy that we believe represents what consumers appreciates and wants today.

 

Enjoy !

Text by Charlotte Bjorklund

 

www.lhoteldebeaune.com

 

 


FOOD FUTURE

back to basics

 

Morris Kitchen Photo by Jennifer Causey - Mast Brother Chocolate Photo by Eric Ryan Anderson

Morris Kitchen Photo by Jennifer Causey - Mast Brother Chocolate Photo by Eric Ryan Anderson

 

 As one of New York City’s most diverse boroughs, Brooklyn is recognized both as a cultural melting pot and as an emblem for the arts. Most recently however, its artistic and entrepreneurial spirit has given rise to a culinary-minded generation.

Preferring pop-up vendors, local markets and cooking classes to chain stores and unimaginative snack bars, Brooklynites are reigniting a passion for food and a passion for people. It is a community devoted to the simple, the local, the individual and the sustainable.

From homemade syrups and hand-crafted knives to biodynamic breweries and old-fashioned recipes for grandma’s relish, Brooklyn is quickly becoming a hub for people who crave “the real.”

The short film series, Made by Hand, (also based in Brooklyn) has set out to chronicle the innovative spirit that has taken hold. Each video pays tribute to the lives and livelihoods that are at the heart of the handmade movement, here and elsewhere.

 Both artistic and informative, this inspirational endeavor discloses the untold stories that are revolutionizing our relationship to food, to craft and to the collective voice that carries us forward — one individual at a time. Text Beth Lauck

 

www.morriskitchen.com

 

www.mastbrotherschocolate.com

 

www.marlowanddaughters.com

 

www.mcclurespickles.com

 

www.brkgin.com

 

 

McClure's Pickles  Photo by John Urbanek

McClure's Pickles Photo by John Urbanek

 

Marlow_and_Daughter_Exterior


FOOD FUTURE

awake your taste!

 

Wynton Marsalis & david Kinch at Paris des Chefs

Wynton Marsalis & David Kinch at Paris des Chefs photo by Cécile Poignant

To our delight, a long-term trend that has arisen in our lives is the blurring of borders between disciplines .

In Paris, a vibrant demonstration of this fundamental trend happened during three days ( January 22-24, 2012). At "Paris des Chefs" gastronomy was flirting with art . Architects, designers, actors, photographers and musicians performed on stage with International Chefs.

Here are five trends to highlight :

Synesthesia. Of all the duos "food + design" organized on stage, I will long remember the most moving: Wynton Marsalis on trumpet and David Kinch, the Chef from San Francisco for a moment of sublime and unique harmony.

Monochrome Many chefs create dishes based on the use of a single colour : 3-stars chef Alain Passard of "Arpege" with "L'assiette jaune" composed of golden ball turnip, yellow carrots, onions and lemon wedges dusted with a cloud of Parmesan. David Toutain, the passionate young chef of "Agapé Substance" has created a white plate full of nuances.

Single product 3 stars chef Anne Sophie Pic cooked, assisted by the winemaker and actress Carole Bouquet, a starter  tribute to all kind of beets: red, yellow, marbled raw and cooked ... a visual delight!

Sustainable During the festival, all Chefs spoke on the importance of vegetables and they paid tribute to the gardeners who grow them. Compliance with the seasons is essential for all.

Interactive On the first floor one could discover cooking classes, wines tasting,  demonstrations, allowing visitors to become involved.Text by Cécile Poignant.

 

www.parisdeschefs.com

 

www.agapesubstance.com

 

Alain Passard at Paris des Chefs photo by cecile poignant

Alain Passard at Paris des Chefs photo by Cécile Poignant

 


FOOD FUTURE

Noma, a one of a kind experience

 

 Noma

photo Charlotte Bjorklund

 

The restaurant is located on Strandgate 5 in Copenhagen.

It looks as simple as a restaurant can be, but isn’t simplicity today the key to happiness ?Everything is very well-thought, from the outfit that the employees are wearing to the disposition of the restaurant… simplicity is definitely the key word here.

After having taste 14 appetizers for the introduction part and 7 meals accompanied by a very nice and interesting wine list, we understood why it’s rated as the number one restaurant in the world.

It’s an experience which makes you forget everything else but the moment and allows you to completely enjoy the present.

The evening started with a glass of bubbling wine and ended with a smile on our face and the thought that we will be definitely back.

Text by Charlotte Bjorklund.

 

www.noma.dk

 

Lidewij Edelkoort

photo by Charlotte Bjorklund

 

 Noma

photo by Charlotte Bjorklund

Noma

photo by Charlotte Bjorklund

photo by Charlotte Bjorklund

 


FOOD FUTURE

natura morta

 

Natura Morta

photos by marius w hansen

Natura Morta — curated by Studio Toogood for Milan Design Week 2001 — is an exhibition that celebrates the darker side of the natural world. Natura Morta, literally translated as “dead nature,” features four outsized, provocative still-lifes composed of abstract and found objects.

 

The installment was also home to a series of “Midnight Dinners”, curated in the exclusive Era Studio Apartment Gallery. With the creative direction of Faye Toogood and abstract food styling of Francesca Sarti, the dinners were prepared by Italian food designers Arabeschi di Latte under the heading, the Underkitchen.

Guests were invited to sample simple, but intriguing ingredients including eggs dyed in tea and spices, black rocks formed out of cheese and rolled in coal, and rustic desserts consisting of black bread soaked in water and dark sugar.

 

Interestingly enough, black colored foods are a signal of health in some parts of the world; most notably, Japan. Black foods are high in phyto-nutrients and have been found to assist metabolism, stimulate the endocrine system, improve digestion, and slow the aging process

 

www.studiotoogood.com

 

Natura Morta

photo by marius w hansen

Natura Morta

photo by marius w hansen


FOOD FUTURE

a flexible feast

Kalasatama

 

The Lapin Kulta Solar Kitchen Restaurant is an environmental and gastronomic art project as well as a gourmet eatery. Built around a solar kitchen, food is cooked solely by the energy of the sun, producing a delightfully different taste experience.

 

Exemplifying the principles of flexibility and immediacy, menus are prepared according to the weather. Guests may be treated to a solar bbq, meals prepared at lower temperatures, or salads. If it rains, reservations are simply rearranged or rescheduled. Instead of manipulating the environment, Lapin’s solar kitchen reminds us not to take the weather — or the world — for granted.

Joined by world-renowned Catalan designer, Marî Guixé; and Finnish food visionary, Antto Melasniemi, the Lapin Solar Kitchen will celebrate the sun, gourmet cooking, Lapin Kulta beer, art and life on its trail towards the perennial sunshine of the Artic Circle.

 

www.lapinkultasolarkitchenrestaurant.com


www.guixe.com


www.kuurna.fi

 

 



FOOD FUTURE

roots and rituals

Marije Vogelzang at Budapest behind her installation

Marije Vogelzang at Budapest behind her installation "Eat Love"

Marije Vogelzang is a pioneer of “eating design”. She is a graduate of the Design Academy in Eindhoven and owner of Proef — a restaurant, gallery and studio rolled into one. She is also storyteller; a kind of gastronomical genealogist, if you will. She examines the psychological, sociological and environmental ramifications of how we eat, with whom we break bread, where our food comes from and how it affects the environment.

Vogelzang’s edible architecture is not only sustainable, it is also performative. Each exhibition is meant to awaken the sense and stir the soul. She seeks to situate food within the greater context of our lives; as  ritual, as nourishment, as memory and as a gateway to a delectable future.

 

www.marijevogelzang.nl

 


FOOD FUTURE

glass & sugar

photo by poldo pomés

photo by poldo pomés

Spain is one of the most logical country when one want  to speak of food and of design. Last month Barcelona was the place to be to discover  a very special event."oh!BCN" is an independent project under the framework of the Barcelona Design Festival. The speakers and all the participants came from gastronomy, design and glass crafts, arts background and trend research.This experience was made of surprising conferences, creative workshops, exhibitions and gastronomic tours.This "happening" was based around the unusual association of food and glass….

The right intersection : there are a lot of similarities between glass and sugar , and this is were it got interesting. Albert Adria (brother of Ferran) showed new products for the new Adrià's restaurant in Barcelona. The pastry chef Crhistian  Escrobà made fascinating demonstrations. Teams were build up and they developed concepts and  products…

A special thank to Mayi Pazos who provided us this information

www.vidrioh.com

 

www.ohbcn.es

 

photo by poldo pomés

photo by poldo pomés

photo by poldo pomés

photo by poldo pomés

photo by poldo pomés

photo by poldo pomés

photo by poldo pomés

photo by poldo pomés

photo by poldo pomés

photo by poldo pomés