GALLERY

aki inomata

photo (c) AKI INOMATA

photo (c) AKI INOMATA

Born in Tokyo in 1983, the Japanese artist Aki Inomata studied at MFA Inter Media Art, Tokyo University of Art. Her artistic project explore different concepts : adaptation, change, protection and architecture; all of them are inspired by natural resources.
 

She is fascinated by the capacity of animals to use the environment to produce wonderful creations in order to protect themselves. The “Girls Girls Girls” project was a long process as it is based on the interaction between living things - female bagworms- and pieces of cloth. Aki Inomata cut in little pieces a serie of women’s clothes, she gave them to the female bagworms and let them built with that fabrics their protective case.
 

As Aki Inomata explains “Male bagworms leave their protective cases when they become adults, and become moths. However female bagworms remain in their protective cases for their whole lives and wait for the male bagworms. This reminded me of my own experience of being approached by hundreds of men, whilst the few men that I was interested in often didn't even glance at me.Though the gender issue is meant to have changed in our generation, why is it that women still make much more effort than men concerning their appearances, and always wait for the men to approach them? I spent two years raising the bagworms and making this piece.

I made it to be premiered in a exhibit at a department store, which sells lots of women’s fashion goods, as a kind of commentary on clothes and women’s fashion.”

 

This piece tells us a lot about the relation between human and nature and explores the connections between biology, human technic and craft.

 

Sophie Hérolt Petitpas

 

www.aki-inomata.com

 

Sophie Hérolt Petitpas is a french journalist free lance found of design and lifestyle. Sophie is also passionate by astrology and its mythical and symbolic aspects. Curious and sensitive, she loved linking and describing her trend hunting with the eyes of mythology in her blog.

 

Sophie ‘s blog

 

photo (c) AKI INOMATA

photo (c) AKI INOMATA

 

photos (c) AKI INOMATA

photos (c) AKI INOMATA

 

photos (c) AKI INOMATA

photos (c) AKI INOMATA

 

 


GALLERY

julien salaud

Julien Salaud : Aviation (enfant 2), 2012

 

In Julien Salaud’s work there is a whole pantheon filled with animals depicted in different ways, such as drawing, etching and sculpture. It is generally accepted that his work examines the connections between man and animal. That is indeed one side of his work, but transformation is really the core of it: wood animals skins or insects turning into something else with additional beads, nails, feathers or rhinestone.

 

Julien Salaud lives and works in Orléans - France. He is represented by Suzanne Tarasiève art gallery in Paris.

 

Where does your interest in working with stuffed animals come from?

In early 2008 I did two tiny sculptures made of bones, feathers, wood pieces and some seeds that I brought back from French Guyana. One of them looked like a stuffed parrot from a specific angle. I was then studying Arts at Paris 8 University and when my professor saw it, she recommended the reading of Steve Baker’s The Postmodern Animal, which is about taxidermy. Baker states that the works of Thomas Grunfeld, by referring to ancient chimera, carries imagination rather than reason. Meanwhile I discovered the work of Chantal Jègues-Wolkiewiez, an ethno astronomer who previously studied Lascaux cave paintings. She demonstrated that the zoomorphic paintings from The Hall of the Bulls correspond with the sky map at the time. Taxidermy occurred in my work at the same time with the piece les Animaux stellaires. These are both some application of Baker’s book and Jègues-Wolkiewiez investigations. And taxidermy was also a good way to think about death and the way I’m intrigued by the concept of it.

 

Do you think studying biochemistry at the University influenced your choices as an artist?

Definitely. The first years I studied hard science and I unsuccessfully attempted to develop logical thinking for myself… Later on my first job consisted of gathering data regarding the impact of human activity on the wildlife in French Guyana. I was not really passionate about it to be honest, but I really enjoyed spending entire days tracking the animals. In the end it took me ten years to admit that I was neither compatible with science, nor with its way of studying the world through order and logic. I then focused on Arts – the one and only continual thing in my chaotic process – without actually giving up the things that interest me for my work. I’m thinking about the ones dealing with environment or nature for example.

 

 

You make pieces that require time, meticulousness and people to help in the process. How do you usually work?

There are different kinds of beauty. I suppose the one I am interested in is like a fruit: I am not following a logical analysis, and I am not trying to have some concept. I am rather into contemplation, which implies taking some time. So if I want the audience to be aroused by contemplation, I have to take some time to be able to create an object that will provoke the same effect. Until two years ago I was still able to work on my own. It may take several months to finish a piece, like the Constellation du cerf (harpe) II. Since the end of the year 2011 the rhythm has increased, and I was no longer in the position to work on my own, I had to call for assistance to make sure the work would be ready on time…

And I have been working with various people, friends or art students since then. Last summer we were like twelve people working in my garden to prepare exhibitions scheduled in October! Working among a team is somehow very inspiring. Works can exist in a way that you would never achieve on your own. In addition to that, working with different people is never a one-way thing. Twenty four hands worked with a lot of patience and precision on the piece entitled Printemps (nymphe de cerf) during two months and a half. I then witnessed the consequences of the creating process on other individuals than myself. It almost convinces me to do workshops-exhibitions where the visitors could also be involved in the making.

 

In a way I do think that the best way to understand a work of art is to participate in the creative process.

 

You are also working with various media, such as drawing, painting, and sculpture of course. Does it allow you to express the same things in different ways? Is it important for you to work with all these media?

Working with various media feels like getting some air or taking holidays. It balances the whole thing you know. I think I would get bored if I was only into drawing or sculpture.

In my case these two media work well together: some drawings from my notebook will transform into sculptures and sculptures will become sketches sometimes. When I cannot make a drawing evolving into a sculpture or the opposite – because it would not match – I take pictures. So changing media is definitely a way of expressing several aspects of a same thing. But there is another possibility too: different media could also alter the artistic process. In that case what comes before and what comes after is totally different, visually speaking and regarding its contents. They are aligned with each other though.

 

I have experienced it once at the moment. But I keep on working with different media hoping that some metamorphosis would happen someday.

 

julien-salaud.info

 

 

 

Adeline Wessang was born in 1977. She graduated from l'Ecole du Louvre in Art History, then specialized in contemporary art at La Sorbonne. She wrote reviews for magazines and curates exhibitions on an occasionally basis. In 2004 she was invited to curate a show at Tate Liverpool for 'A Secret History of Clay'.

She launched www.noblahblah.org in 2008. Currently working at Palais de Tokyo, center for contemporary art located in Paris.

 

Julien Salaud : Constellation du cerf (harpe) II, 2011

 

Julien Salaud : Les trois temps de la constellation du chevreuil, 2011

 

Julien Salaud : Vieux Piraï Emplumé (2008)


GALLERY

recycled beauty

 

lemonade

 

There is a peculiar curiosity in looking at the contemporary world using art’s classical themes and codes. In a way, it gives us the possibility to compare and contrast, and situate us in a particular, familiar tradition. The still life is one such artistic canon which has stimulated artists in all eras. A style particularly replete with symbolism (from Vanitas to the Resurrection and images of wealth), still life has evolved by reflecting the latest popular customs and socio-economic climate – making it all the more compelling to track trends and changes in habits through the way this subject has been treated throughout the centuries.

 

In their series "Recycled Beauty", photographer Laurie Frankel and designer Diane Gatterdam have tackled the still life tradition. The atmosphere is reminiscent of the stark simplicity of Willem Claeszoon Heda’s (1593-1680) paintings: neutral backgrounds, a post-meal mess enhanced by rich textures: glass, metal… and their contemporary equivalent, plastic. Despite similar components, however, it is not abundance and lavishness that the series points to, but rather to mundane, unremarkable elements of contemporary daily life. While old masters would use props such as candles to draw attention to the ephemerality and perishability of life, Frankel and Gatterdam reverse the concept: “These photos highlight the extraordinary amount of disposable items in our lives we use for an instant but then live on for years, while nature renews itself in a seamless continual rhythm." The plastic, packaging and wrapping paper may be crushed and stained, but never wither – and unlike the toppled silver and glass tableware of Heda’s paintings, the once used containers will not be picked up and put away to be used again at a later feast.

Necessarily, the installations call attention to the notably absent humans. Through the use of stark and delicate compositions clearly pointing to a revered art tradition, Frankel and Gatterdam bring us face to face with fascinating images of the permanence and strange beauty of our ‘trash.’ Like the still lives of hunted game, where the artists succeeded to veil the cruel death by elevating the animals to art, here the packaging is not seen as disposable but is looked at for its formalist qualities: the glistening transparent plastic, the crumpled napkins, the singular shapes of glass containers (filled with dirty water, or broken). If still life can still reflect the habits and reality of contemporary humans, then Recycled Beauty shows our society starting to ponder questions of the after-life of the consumption process and the inherent (yet hidden) refinement of plastic and packaging in general, raising questions of why it is that we treat such potentially durable and captivating objects with such contempt.

 

Mathilde Leblond

 

 lauriefrankel.com

 

 dianegatterdam.com

 

Mathilde Leblond is a UK-based trendwatcher with a passion for creativity, beauty and the future. For Trend Tablet she contributes posts about some of the most arresting artists and creators which she scours the internet to find out about.

 

mathilde leblond

 

Butterfly

 

Fly in the milk

 

Onion Box

 

Solar Batteries

 

Black Radish

 


GALLERY

architectural air

 

photo by André Grossmann

 

An overbearing colossus appears on the horizon among hundreds of other giant industrial monuments while arriving in the productional heart of Germany. “Big Air Package” by Christo is an installation in the Gasometer complex of Oberhausen, a colossal gas silo which derives from the industrial characteristics of the Ruhr area in Germany. Where usually you would recognize the work by Christo from miles away due to the enormous packed surfaces, this time only a big poster covers the exterior of the silo, trying to grab the attention of the millions of car drivers passing by.

 

The Bulgarian born artist Christo Vladimirov Javacheff is known for his large scale projects, from packaging the Reichstag in Berlin or the Pont Neuf in Paris, Christo’s and Jeanne-Claude’s work always had one thing in common; influencing rural, urban and domestic landscapes using huge quantities of fabric. The contextualizing nature of their work is applied to the interior of a building this time.

 

The Big Air Package in the Ruhr area of Germany is the first installation by Christo after his wife and work partner Jeanne-Claude passed away in 2009. Remarkably the art piece is covering the invisible, content of a building, instead of wrapping the exterior as seen in Christo's previous works. Although they have been creating Air Packages since 1966 this latest work of art has a focus on the experience of entering the intervention.

 

A message which we interpreted as an ode to Jeanne-Claude. The installation is a mesmerizing play between air and architecture, between the existing building and the temporary intervention. An enormous textile cocoon, held under pressure and kept in place by a bulky rope which is wrapped around the package, is positioned in the core of the historic gas silo and covers a large percentage of the storage space. Reminiscent of the gas that was once stored in the space.

 

When entering the cocoon visitors are welcomed in a serene space, every possible sensory perception transforms into a mesmerizing experience. Sound is being echoed, vision is dazzling due to the delusion of endlessness, the smell in the big bubble can be described as something you remember from your youth and the climate is calm and windless.

“When the Big Air Package was finally installed, it was absolutely unexpected what I saw. The fabric very much transports the light. You are virtually swimming in light when you are inside the Big Air Package. The inner space is probably the most unique aspect of all the Air Packages that we did since 1966.When experienced from the inside, that space is almost like a 90-meter-high cathedral.” Christo states.

 

W. Schenk & J. van den Langenberg

 

www.gasometer.de

 

www.christojeanneclaude.net

 

 

Jules van den Langenberg recently graduated at Design Academy Eindhoven. He initiates-, curates- and exhibits projects in which applied art and design are used as a medium to cultivate culture. Jules approaches the world as a library full of potential, with an inexhaustible resource: humans and their skills. Within this wonderland of opportunities the young -Willy Wonka like- artistic industrialist travels to meet people and researches the social- and cultural impact of all that is man made.

Through associative thinking Jules develops narratives and concepts which form fundaments for publications, exhibitions and self initiated projects as well as commissioned works. Jules regularly shares with us some of his discoveries and « coup de coeur ».

 

For this specific article he went on a field trip with Willem Schenk, a young fashion professional. It’s the anthropological approach to fashion that fascinates him. Being able to see connections within society and distil the essence of the Zeitgeist brings meaning to everything we see and do. Therefore it intrigues him to investigate the reasons behind the way we act, create and dress ourselves. While finalizing the course Fashion & Management in Amsterdam, Willem has worked in Paris as a research assistant for MoBA13. Currently the UK is his new home, where he's continuing his studies at the Nottingham Trent University.

 

Jules van den Langenberg

 

Willem Schenk

 

 

Left photo by André Grossmann - Right photo by Wolfgang Volz

 

photo by Wolfgang Volz

 

photo by Wolfgang Volz

 

photo by Wolfgang Volz

 

Christo in his Big air Package. Photo by Wolfgang Volz


GALLERY

ryan gander

 

Make everything like it’s your last, digital prints Decaux panel, 2013

Make every show like it’s your last. The title Ryan Gander picked for his current show at Le Plateau in Paris sounds like some advertising motto. In a way, it could also recall Steve Jobs’ famous quote: ‘Live each day as if it was your last‘. The title induces that when people are committed to a creative process, such as artists, they are expected to be genuinely brilliant each time they produce a work or a show. The whole concept is about imagination, a notion that is widely asserted in the show.

 

In the main lobby, the audience is welcomed by some advertising light box by JC Decaux, the same you can find around the streets of Paris. Behind a black curtain, the visitor is welcomed by a monolithic sculpture made of mirrored glass which stands in the middle of a darkened room. He then could expect something to happen, such as a video projection as the set up recalls the ones generally used in contemporary art exhibitions, but there is nothing going on. He may wonder if the work is broken, he does not even know if he is facing a work of art or not. Those kinds of questions is what Ryan Gander is interesting in as an artist exhibiting work in a show: making objects that remain ambiguous to the spectator.

 

In the next room a short video is screened, its title, Imagineering, which combines the words ‘imagination’ and ‘engineering’, was inspired by Walt Disney who believed that imagination could allow everyone to fulfil their own dreams. The video running time is less than a minute and it is very similar to a typical British TV commercial. It was commissioned by Ryan Gander to a professional advertising agency to promote creativity in Britain, as if the actual client was the British government’s Department for Business, Innovation & Skills. Gander says he was very interested in the idea of promoting a concept, something that was not a product or an object. So the video is at the same time a TV commercial and a work of art or only one of these two options. There are multiple readings in the work of Ryan Gander and it is up to the audience to decide.

Then the visitor steps into a narrow hall in the dark and discover a framed glass window on the left wall. It seems to lead into some forest, a place the artist refers to as ‘Culturefield’, a territory where creativity is experienced without any intellectual or conceptual boundaries. Tank with ‘Entrance to a clearing‘ is fiction, it is not real, it suggest something else, it says ‘use your imagination‘.

 

The next room is empty, except for a pair of eyes emerging from a white wall and staring at the visitor who passes by. They adopt various expressions such as curiosity, boredom, anger, confusion, concentration or happiness; the ones that exhibition goers usually experience when confronted to an artwork. With Magnus Opus, the spectator becomes the one who is watched.

 

Adeline Wessang

 

Make every show like it’s your last – Ryan Gander
Le Plateau - Paris . Curator: Xavier Franceschi

Ryan Gander is an artist based in London and Suffolk, UK. He is represented by GB Agency in Paris, and Lisson Gallery in London.

 

 

Adeline Wessang was born in 1977. She graduated from l'Ecole du Louvre in Art History, then specialized in contemporary art at La Sorbonne. She wrote reviews for magazines and curates exhibitions on an occasionally basis. In 2004 she was invited to curate a show at Tate Liverpool for 'A Secret History of Clay'.

She launched www.noblahblah.org in 2008. Currently working at Palais de Tokyo, center for contemporary art located in Paris.

 

Left : The Useless Machine with Blowing Curtain, mirrored perspex, electrical components, curtain, 2013. Right: Tank with ‘Entrance to a clearing’, metal, glass, wood, artificial plants, lighting, 2013

 

Imagineering, video HD, sound, 2013

 

A lamp made by the artist for his wife (Thirty-first attempt), homewares and DIY materials from BHV, 2013

 

Magnus Opus, animatronic eyes, sensors, computer, 2013

 

I is… (ii), marble resin, 2013. Image by Ken Adlard

 

All pictures: Courtesy Ryan Gander Studio


GALLERY

post natural history by vincent fournier

 

Sophie Hérolt Petitpas is a french journalist free lance found of design and lifestyle. She is also passionate by astrology and its mythical and symbolic aspects. Curious and sensitive, she loved linking and describing her trend hunting with the eyes of mythology in her blog.

 

 

Born in Ougadoudgou (Burkina Fasso) in 1970, Vincent Fournier kept from his childhood, the sense of imagination, the taste to explore uncommon and mysterious worlds, places where everything can be possible, imagine or recreated. That’s why, his work is inspired by the mixed of scientifical researches and different forms of utopia. His interest for Science is not linked specifically with the technical aspects but with his esthetical and storytelling dimension.  They gave him a great material to imagine new beings  mixing future, utopia and real scientifical knowledges. His photos play with reality and perception, truth and false, alive and artificial. He doesn’t want to give us one answer but let the observer imagine his own interpretation.

 

His last project, Post Natural History is both, an exhibition and a splendid book, which reveal with grace and perfection this approach of this creative mixed between art and science.  “My intention is to reinterpret this idea of cabinet of curiosity but by being valid a journey in the time rather than in the space. As during the period of the Renaissance, where we returned strange creature of distant and unknown countries, my images show species newcomers of future”.  Vincent Fournier used a very creative “neologism”  to describe his creatures, “a collection of “upcoming living species”. These animals are inspired “from the current researches on the synthetic biology and there create or reprogrammed by the Man for his own needs and also so they can adapt themselves to the biological changes of the planet”.

A sort of neo Darwin theory coming out the future. The originality and beauty of this works is this impression at the first sight, to look an old zoological book or a collection from an antique cabinet of curiosity, but when you observe the details, you can see unusual members, shapes, colors and you are transported in another world. This is few examples explained by Vincent : “We re-know a cat, a lizard, a poppy, a dragonfly but looking closer, we realize certain differences. The Ibis has legs in metal to resist to extreme temperatures. The dragonfly possesses a transparent glass belly in which luminescent sensor measure the rate of pollution. The Rhino beetle is provided with the GPS (Global Positioning System) integrated into its metallic antenna”.

 

Engraved on a plate in brass, these explanations “scientist” accompany every image, exactly as on a didactic board. The result is simply amazing and Jules Vernes would have probably adored this book.

 

Sophie Hérolt Petitpas

 

www.vincentfournier.co.uk

 

Post Natural History box set of 20 photographs in limited edition of 50 copies Editions Be –pôles .

 

This work is presented to the Galerie Ravestijn in Amsterdam.

Acte 2 in Paris.

Part of the exhibitions Biodesign at Rotterdam Museum  September 27th  2013 -  5th January 2014

 

 

Sophie's Blog 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RHINO BEETLE (Oryctes transmissionis )Insect adapted to continuous tracking

 

TREEHOPPER (Hemikyptha botulI)Pollutant-sensitive insect

 

 

WEEVIL (Entimus jumpis)Highly-adaptable jumping insect

 

PANGOLIN (Uromanis supraclimatis) Climate change-tolerant mammal

 

ROBOTIC JELLYFISH DRONE (Cyanea machina) self-activates above 30°C to transport freshwater from rivers to dry remote agricultural

 

lizard

ROBOTIC JELLYFISH DRONE (Cyanea machina) self-activates above 30°C to transport freshwater from rivers to dry remote agricultural

 


GALLERY

miyuki yamanaka

 

 

Camilla Ginevra Bo' is an Italian architect and freelance journalist. She gained her degree in architecture in Rome, spending two years of the course studying in Paris. After she graduated in 2011, she returned to Rome to pursue a career in art, design and fashion criticism. Whilst in Rome, Bo' completed the fashion editing and styling course at the European Institute of Design. She also began writing about art and design for the Italian Association of Architecture and Criticism and on her personal blog. In September 2012 Camilla moved to London to study Art Direction for Fashion at Central Saint Martins. Since completing the course she joined SHOWstudio: The Home of Fashion Film as the Gallery Assistant and she is now working as a freelance contributor for different magazines.

 

"Summer diary" by Miyuki Yamanaka is a diary to document the death of her mum. More than that, a tribute to life.

 

While many individual images are stunners (the shocking death portrait for example) the book make it clear these images were meant to be seen together and viewing them any other way is like taking a single line from a long poem.

The sky plays a key element in this project and acts as a handhold. It constantly appears and disappears like a breath of fresh air. The sky is the only element able to connect everyone to the mother, the symbol of family.With a disarming lucidity, Miyuki tells me about the agony and resignation in front of something there's no way to fight for. She tells me about an inner force that she didn't believe she could be able of, totally unexpected and surprising.

 

This work that stands in the tradition of japanese aesthetic is particularly spectacular for its disarming simplicity.

 

Everyone can look at the sky but few know how to paint the sky in a so universal way. Miyuki transforms the reality that surrounds her into art, a reality that is no longer the simple nature, but the complicated world in which we live.

 

When you showed me the diary for the first time, I thought about how strong you must have been to shoot what was happening. Why did you choose to document one of the hardest moment in life?

Over there, in that moment, there was no time to think. I never had this urge to document this event, I was just clicking the shutter. I didn't clearly understand why I did it. So I kept all the films in a drawer to let them sleep for a while. Then I gradually understood what it was… I wanted to tell the fact that nature of life is like this, at least mine. It was hard but natural and in a positive way.

Emerge a job done with great discretion, not screamed but collected in a good period of time. Why did you wait 3 years to let it out?

For 2/3 years I was digesting the event and not sure this would be something I'd like to share with someone else. I also wanted to wait and see how the form of my family was changing; grandma was getting emaciated, cousins got pregnant, getting to know about my dad as a person. I never had this strong relationship with my local place and family except for my childhood. And then when I saw the sky in London 2012, everything came to the point.

 

The sky is the key element of the project. What does it mean to you? 

Looking up to the sky, I can feel all the things are connected and that I am just a part of it. It's about invisible things. There, in the sky. Mom is now, in a way, closer to me. How I explained on the cover, we will eventually go back to the nature again. I feel my mom is part of me. She is everywhere; in the water I drink, in the air I breath. The fact to understand that the death is a natural event make me feel more calm and stronger. We tend to rely on tangible things but what I want to observe is something we cannot to see, which causes us pain but also gives me great pleasure.

 

Listening to you it seems to be a positive message out of the miserable events in life… how did you arrive to this?

Nothing would be the same; space, people... and you. Everything is just temporary. It was such a shock to realize that it's certain I'm dying someday. What is important and what is not to me, it became more clear now, and how important simple things are in life.

 

Born in Nara, Japan, after 8 years in London, she recently came back to her home country to develop some intimate projects… I can see her so far from here, walking silently, pondering, surrounded by nature. Because it's nature her only way.

 

Camilla Bo’

 

 

Miyuki Yamanaka 's website

 

Camilla Bo' s website

 

 

MIYUKI YAMANAKA

 

MIYUKI YAMANAKA

 

MIYUKI YAMANAKA

 

MIYUKI YAMANAKA

 

MIYUKI YAMANAKA

 

MIYUKI YAMANAKA

 

MIYUKI YAMANAKA

 

MIYUKI YAMANAKA

 

MIYUKI YAMANAKA


GALLERY

mathias sterner

photo by mathias sterner

 

Photographer Mathias Sterner was born in Kalmar, a town on the Swedish east coast. He is educated at Gamleby photo academy, and after having spent a year in Paris post graduation, he moved to Stockholm. Nowadays Sterner divides his time between Stockholm and London, and has contributed to magazines such as Dazed & Confused, Tank and Livraison.

 

He draws his inspiration from Nature: from the shapes and patterns of landscapes and forests. Sterner also loves the inspiration he finds in renaissance painting and sculpture. These combined influences can be seen in his sensitive and intriguing imagery, where he beautifully makes light, form and textures come together.

The images Mathias took for Dazed Digital in the fashion story "The Beautiful Fall" features the designs of the talented Japanese fashion student Chiaki Moronaga.

 

 

Photography: Mathias Sterner

Stylist: Elisabeth Fraser-Belle

Hair: Christos Kallaniotis at Terrie Tanaka using Pantene pro V

Make-up: Nobuko Maekawa using MAC

Model: Yana at M and P models

 

 

minkmgmt.com

 

photo by mathias sterner

 

photos by mathias sterner

 

photo by mathias sterner

 

photo by mathias sterner

 

 

 


GALLERY

ernesto neto

 

Ernesto Neto at Louis Vuitton Tokyo photo Jeremie Souteyrat

Louis Vuitton / Jérémie Souteyrat

 

Ernesto Neto is a contemporary artist from Brazil, considered one of the absolute leaders in the country's art scene. For the artist, it is important that the viewer should interact with his work, engaging multiple senses and exploring a multi-sensory experience.

 

Inspired by Brazilian Neo-concretism, a movement in the 50s and 60s that rejected modernism and its geometric abstraction, Neto's work resembles living organisms and an organic architecture. As described by the artist, his work is an exploration of the body's landscape from within.

 

His work is primarily exhibited in large exhibitions, where the abstract installations grow and often fill the entire space. Pourous and stretchy nylon or cotton fabrics create a skin around wooden skeletons or hang from the ceiling like tear drops. These materials are often filled with spices, inviting the spectator not only to touch the work but also smell and sense it. In other works, the material is used to make organic structures itself.

Neto has been awarded Chevalier de L'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres for his installation at the Panthéon in Paris called Leviathan Thot. In 2009 the artist exhibited at New York's Park Avenue Armory, filling the 5,100 square meter hall with a maze-like structure.

 

His latest installation is for the Louis Vuitton store in Tokyo, where visitors were invited to walk on and interact with a suspended pathway made from his stretchable material.

 

Ryan Moritz

 

espacelouisvuittontokyo.com

 

Jerimie Souteyrat's website

 

 

Ernesto Neto at Louis Vuitton Tokyo photo Jeremie Souteyrat

Louis Vuitton / Jérémie Souteyrat

 

Ernesto Neto at Louis Vuitton Tokyo photo Jeremie Souteyrat

Louis Vuitton / Jérémie Souteyrat

 

Ernesto Neto at Louis Vuitton Tokyo photo Jeremie Souteyrat

Louis Vuitton / Jérémie Souteyrat

 

Ernesto Neto at Louis Vuitton Tokyo photo Jeremie Souteyrat

Louis Vuitton / Jérémie Souteyrat

 


GALLERY

kim kyoung soo

 

 

Courtesy Kim Kyung Soo / Galerie Paris-Beijing

Courtesy Kim Kyung Soo / Galerie Paris-Beijing

 

When Vogue Korea asked Kim Kyoung Soo, a renowned fashion photographer to realize a series of fashion portraits that would re-actualize the traditionnal Korean costum (Hanbok), he also decided to realize his series Full Moon Story. His models are elegantly staged, wearing somptuous Hanbok, with their haircuts and make-up done perfectly. There is a serenity, poetry and softness which emanates from the pictures that astonishes and instantly puts the viewer in a contemplative state of mind.

As he said : "During the National traditionnal festivities called 'Chuseok', many Korean people used to wear the hanbok. I wanted to show this typical ambiance with both a lyric and modern touch. I wanted a neutral stage; only shadows and reflections mattered to me: Colours, faces and models were enhanced by cold and light tones creating an almost surreal feeling."

 

www.parisbeijingphotogallery.com

 

 

Courtesy Kim Kyung Soo / Galerie Paris-Beijing

Courtesy Kim Kyung Soo / Galerie Paris-Beijing

 

Courtesy Kim Kyung Soo / Galerie Paris-Beijing

Courtesy Kim Kyung Soo / Galerie Paris-Beijing

 

Courtesy Kim Kyung Soo / Galerie Paris-Beijing

Courtesy Kim Kyung Soo / Galerie Paris-Beijing

 

 

 

 


GALLERY

estelle hanania

 

 

 

photo by estelle hanania

photo by estelle hanania

 

While pursuing her graduate degree at the School of Fine Arts in Paris, Estelle Hanania spent her free time in the photo lab, experimenting with the large-scale color prints for which she has become renowned. She decided to pursue a career behind the lens and the payoff was immediate : a month after receiving her degree, Hanania won the photo prize at the 2006 Hyères Festival.

 

Since then, her photographs have appeared in Vice, The Wire, Exit, Sang Bleu and Capricious, among others, and she has been commissioned by fashion brands including Maison Martin Margiela, Opening Ceremony, Damir Doma, Issey Miyake and Zucca.

 

Her pictures brings us in a parallel and fantasy world, the same world you're going when you're listening to Tchaikovsky's Swan lake.

 

Full of grace, her creatures seem to be there for ages, and we're witness of an incredible scene through Hanania's eyes. Documentaries is an artistic form that inspires her a lot, it reality has a stronger impact on her and when it is directed by an inspired person that can be amazingly strong.

The sharp realness of her photographs makes a startling contrast to the ethereality of their subjects : burning hands, glittery crystals, spookily-real human scarecrows, and men dressed as eery, totem-like birds.

 

It seems that she is searching for a form language to reconnect with the ancestors, trying to get back to the origins. A primary language which is hidden inside everyone of us, but which we have forgotten, finding the magic in the common things, with a certain naivety of a childish glance.

 

She likes to be in an unknown environment and loose her mark for a while to get that innocent and fresh look. Fortunately this position seems to suit her, she's still entertained and has an huge inquiring mind, so she's not giving up this naive look and will surprised us a lot more.

 

 

Caroline Aufort

 

estellehanania

 

 

 

 

photos by estelle hanania

photos by estelle hanania

 

photo by estelle hanania

photo by estelle hanania

 

photos by estelle hanania

photos by estelle hanania

 

photo by estelle hanania

photo by estelle hanania

 

photos by estelle hanania

photos by estelle hanania

photo by estelle hanania

photo by estelle hanania

 

photos by estelle hanania

photos by estelle hanania

 

photos by estelle hanania

photos by estelle hanania

 

photo by estelle hanania

photo by estelle hanania

 

 


GALLERY

esther voisin

photos by esther voisin

photos by esther voisin

 

Esther Voisin is  a photographer based in Paris and in the USA. She specializes in still-life, portrait, and editorial photography.She uses black & whites as well as colours. Several of her books have been published in Paris and are sold in the Centre Pompidou and the Palais de Tokyo, among other places.

 

For you to get to know her better, we interviewed her for Trendtablet:

 

Which color touches you the most ?

White, peaceful and strong.

 

What is the first thing you do in the morning?

I open my eyes; from my bed I look through the window and see the sky and palm trees. The light and colors set the tone for my day. It's same image every day with different hues. A joy.

Which song lets your imagination carry on away somewhere ?

"Out of this world" by John Coltrane

 

What's your favorite food/meal?

Anything with veggies, grains, olive oil and parmesan.

 

What is your favorite moment of the day ?

Dawn & sunset

Do you remember the first picture you ever took?

No, I don't. But I have a feeling it was still-life.

 

In what kind of mood  are you into those days?

Secretive & creative.

 

What do you feel is influencing photography and photographers in a big way today?

The Art market, and the overload of information and images we ingest every day from the virtual world.

 

Some of your favorite references ? (photography, art, movies, literature.....) 

This is a long and ever-growing list, but I would say that my favorite references in art, literature, photography, cinema, and music are rooted in the contemporary art/cultural movements. The avant-garde movement, counter-culture, independent culture, the abstract and minimalism.

Anything with an innovative, visionary and unique voice, and a rebellious scream.

 

 

www.esthervoisin.com

 

photos by esther voisin

photos by esther voisin

 

photo by esther voisin

photo by esther voisin

 

photos by esther voisin

photos by esther voisin

 

photo by esther voisin

photo by esther voisin

 

photo by esther voisin

photo by esther voisin

 

photo by esther voisin

photo by esther voisin

 

 

 


GALLERY

scheltens & abbenes

 

photo by scheltens & abbenes

photo by scheltens & abbenes

 

When I first saw a serie of pictures of Scheltens & Abbenes, I though "That's amazing, a fashion shoot, without girls and so elegant, so beautiful, so refreshing !" Then I looked at their website and I saw Art, commissions and editorial series of pictures. There is just a few photographers who try to be fashion and fine art photographers and make it with that success and talent.

 

They fascinated us by their methodical arrangements of assorted objects to create new ones. Even if it's really a strict and considerable precise work process, for a really geometric outcome, we feel liberty and poetry when we look at it. They show us a new way to see objects and photography. Just as Charles and Ray Eames introduced a new way to see design years ago. The similarly between them is not just to be visionary, even in the way of working you can see it : Eames used to say "Art resides in the quality of doing, process is not magic" and "Design is a plan for arranging elements in such a way as best to accomplish a particular purpose."

 

Their last serie "Detail in Reverse" show us one more time the magic touch they have: create,with the immaterial process of photography, objects by illusion.

 They transformed common household draperies or stacked goblets made of cheap, reflective plastic or basics tins in pictures of sacred and decorated vessels."After all, anything created solely for the camera is a projection. If the various props used here appear to be of great monetary value while in fact being nearly worthless the viewer will come away deceived. But it is up to the viewer to explore his own projections and transform his own disillusion into an analytic quest for the true nature of the photographic. To this end, the artists really offer more than enough clues in the form of tapestries which bring optical illusion and the reversal of handicraft as a counterpoint to the fore." Very well explained by Frank van der Stok on their website's introduction.

 

If photography is just about capture moments to keep them, it is the best demonstration!

 

Caroline Aufort

 

www.scheltens-abbenes.com

 

 

photo by scheltens & abbenes

photo by scheltens & abbenes

 

photo by scheltens & abbenes

photo by scheltens & abbenes

 

photo by scheltens & abbenes

photo by scheltens & abbenes

 

photo by scheltens & abbenes

photo by scheltens & abbenes

 

photo by scheltens & abbenes

photo by scheltens & abbenes


GALLERY

lucie and simon

 

photo by lucie & simon

photo by lucie & simon

Living in Paris, Lucie & Simon, a duo of a french and a german photographer, have been working together since 2005.

Lucie & Simon’s projects are conceived as series, which all outsmart our perception of reality by staging a quirky view of daily life. From urban or family solitude to existential wanderings, their compositions capture different moods of man’s silent melancholy, focusing on the narrow chink between our existence and the world of dreams. In an enigmatic universe rekindling the memory of Edward Hopper’s paintings, each character seems totally absorbed by the timelessness of dreams.

The silent world is suddenly endowed with an oppressive eloquence. Is it a poetic day after an apocalypse? A fantasy of huge cities became quiet where few survivor are going for a walk in intact remains of a dead civilization.

This serie of about thirty pictures comes with a seven minutes film. The spectator get absorbed in desert places, wandering about the way we are living in our current world…

Subject and text by Caroline Aufort.

 

www.lucieandsimon.com

 

 

photo by lucie & simon

photo by lucie & simon

 

photo by lucie & simon

photo by lucie & simon

 

photo by lucie & simon

photo by lucie & simon

 

photo by lucie & simon

photo by lucie & simon

 

photo by lucie & simon

photo by lucie & simon

 

photo by lucie & simon

photo by lucie & simon

 


GALLERY

tomás saraceno

 

Photo by Tomás Saraceno & David von Becker

Photo by Tomás Saraceno & David von Becker

 

Tomás Saraceno’s “Cloud Cities” — most recently featured at the Hamburger Bahnhof in Berlin — is a collection of geometric, inflated shapes that challenge our notions of space, place, gravity and future.

 

Each of the cloud city-pods is suspended in the air at various heights, and is dotted with succulent plants or lined with symmetrical string patterning. Two of the pods in this pseudo-biosphere are accessible to the public. Guests may climb a ladder to tread upon the diameter of the sphere or choose to rest on the moss-covered floor of the dome.

Saraceno’s installation is driven by his interest in utopian theory. He works in different media and is interested in our present and future living environment. He draws inspiration from soap bubbles, dust particles that float in the air, spider webs, and visionary figures such as Buckminster Fuller.

Tomás Saraceno was born in 1973 in Tucuman / Argentina. He currently lives and works in Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

 

His next exhibition will be in New York at the Met.

 

Text & subject by Beth Lauck

 

www.tomassaraceno.com

 

www.metmuseum.org

 

 

Photo by Tomás Saraceno & David von Becker

Photo by Tomás Saraceno & David von Becker

 

Photo by Tomás Saraceno & David von Becker

Photo by Tomás Saraceno & David von Becker

 

Photo by Tomás Saraceno & David von Becker

Photo by Tomás Saraceno & David von Becker

Photo by Tomás Saraceno & David von Becker

Photo by Tomás Saraceno & David von Becker

 


GALLERY

jim hodges

Jim Hodges - Photo by David Regen

Photos by David Regen. Jim Hodges - Untitled, 2011.Granite, stainless steel and lacquer.75 x 248 x 301 inches installed. Copyright Jim Hodges - Courtesy Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels

Jim Hodges’ latest, two-part exhibition has opened at the Gladstone Gallery in New York City — mounted across both gallery spaces in Chelsea. For the last two decades, Hodges has utilized a broad range of materials  — both precious and commonplace — to transform quotidian objects into reflective sculptures. Merging the personal, political and universal, Hodges seeks to evince the immemorial; timeless discourses of identity, loss, mortality and love.

Using manipulated, mirror-like elements — inspired by his recent trip to India — Hodges features a greater focus on color, saturation and performance. His artwork creates a space for introspection, investigating notions of time, movement, and imagination. Employing organic shapes and synthetic materials, Hodges’ sculptures exemplify the importance of cross-disciplinary creation and analysis.

Employing organic shapes and synthetic materials, Hodges’ sculptures exemplify the importance of cross-disciplinary creation and analysis. Jim Hodges was born in 1957 in Spokane, Washington and received his MFA from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, NY. He was recently appointed to serve as the Acting Director of the Graduate Sculpture Department at the Yale University School of Art for the 2011/2012 academic year.

 

www.gladstonegallery.com

 

www.jimhodges.com

 

 Jim Hodges Photo by David Regen

 Jim Hodges Photo by David Regen

 Jim Hodges Photo by David Regen


GALLERY

michel rajkovic


Michel Rajkovic

Michel Rajkovic - Photo by Julie Rey

There are places in the world that carry and transform you, lights that enchant and transfix the mind, landscapes that evoke memory, illusion and imagination.

The work of Michel Rajkovic begins in such a setting. His photography does not reveal landscapes as we perceive them. Rather, he seeks to convey the mystic grandeur of the land he inhabits. The seas reveal his calm demeanor, the clouds above disclose the rare moments of solitude that define the breadth of his work.

With considerable patience, Rajkovic captures a kind of dream-crossed twilight; an elusive, yet tangible rendez-vous between the worlds of past, present and future.Opening the door to imagination, Rajkovic unearths the parallels between mind and matter. In a remarkable quest for the inner worlds of outer space, Rajkovic indelibly returns to the land until the ephemeral traces of the natural world are authentically illuminated.

www.michelrajkovic.fr

 

michel rajkovic

photo by michel rajkovic

photo by michel rajkovic

photo by michel rajkovic

photo by michel rajkovic

photo by michel rajkovic

photo by michel rajkovic

photo by michel rajkovic

photo by michel rajkovic

photo by michel rajkovic

photo by michel rajkovic

photo by michel rajkovic

photo by michel rajkovic

photo by michel rajkovic

photo by michel rajkovic

photo by michel rajkovic

photo by michel rajkovic

photo by michel rajkovic

photo by michel rajkovic

photo by michel rajkovic


GALLERY

valentino fialdini

Valentino Fialdini  Self Portrait

Self Portrait by Valentino Fialdini

Valentino Fialdini is a photographer born in Sào Paulo in 1976. We would like to introduce you to his exhibition "Lego".

For you to get to know him better, we interviewed him for trendtablet. Which place do you love best? My house - The sound that carry you? Jazz - Your favorite meal? Risottos - At what moment of the day do you feel great? The time I wake up

What is your favorite material? Creativity - The color that moves you the most? Nature - Your first gesture in the morning? Turn the alarm clock off before it rings - Which smell/perfume give you emotion? Food in the owen


www.valentinofialdini.com

 

photo by valentino fialdini

photo by valentino fialdini

photo by valentino fialdini

photo by valentino fialdini

photo by valentino fialdini

photo by valentino fialdini

photo by valentino fialdini

photo by valentino fialdini

photo by valentino fialdini

photo by valentino fialdini


GALLERY

agathe philbé

agathe philbé

autoportrait by agathe philbé

I was born in France in 1982 with spanish origins. I studied litterature and

philosophy for 2 years, and started photography a few years later. I learnt

all the technical things I had to learn in San Francisco and New York, before

moving back to Paris. I now shoot for a wide variety of clients  -magazines,

design and communication agencies, start-ups, etc- and for myself.

I am attracted to natural light playing on moving bodies, waters or trees;

it makes me feel alive in the most genuine way, and this is what I try to

capture and share when I take photographs.

 

www.agathephilbe.com

www.citiesandlights.com

photo by agathe philbé

photo by agathe philbé

photo by agathe philbé

photo by agathe philbé

photo by agathe philbé

photo by agathe philbé

photo by agathe philbé

photo by agathe philbé

photo by agathe philbé

photo by agathe philbé

 

photo by agathe philbé

photo by agathe philbé

photo by agathe philbé

photo by agathe philbé

photo by agathe philbé

photo by agathe philbé


Sometimes after a storm, the wind suddenly disappears and the water seems softer than ever. There is so much room in this renewed silence -it melts with the ocean itself.

The water was so cold that I forgot how cold I was when swimming in the waves; then I came back to Paris and got sick for a few days, but I think it was worth it. Spring cleaning.


GALLERY

jerome lobato

Self_Lobato

Selfportrait

Lobato is a photographer in art, still life and fashion. He is born in Paris in september 1973. He is half french by his mother and half Brazilian/Portugues by his dad. He lives in Paris, which he finds very inspiring.

He has been involved with photography since he was a kid. His vision is clear and clean. He loves pop, contemporary and conceptual art. Music, specially electronic -music is an important aspect of his creative process.

jeromelobato.com

 

Lobato_2

photo by Jerome Lobato

Lobato_3

photo by Jerome Lobato

Lobato_8

photo by Jerome Lobato

Lobato_4

photo by Jerome Lobato

Lobato_5

photo by Jerome Lobato

Lobato_7

photo by Jerome Lobato

Lobato_9

photo by Jerome Lobato

Lobato_6

photo by Jerome Lobato