TALENTS

tom mckenzie

 

tom mckenzie


 

Tom Mckenzie is an australian, Denkmark based photographer whose work is distinguished, passionate and emotional.  Growing up in a both musical and highly academic family allowed him to get inspired by a blend of various factors - Ancient Greek mythology, modern natural and biological phenomena, sexuality and mystical theory. With a strong fascination with new ways of interpreting reality and contemporary identity and how our generation, with our resources and complex technology, may discover a new language in which to describe our place in the ever-changing world, he invites you to explore a surreal world and creates a sentimental feeling in its beholder.

His project 'CHRYSALIS' (2012) was made in close collaboration with sound and set designer, Simon Holk Witzansky and was created as an editorial for The88.dk. Looking at the biological metamorphosis of snakes and moths, the geological processes of plate tectonics, rock and crystal formation, as well as incorporating classical and medieval depictions of warriors and heroes, they created a rich universe which gave new meaning to a mythological story of light and dark, confrontation and resolution.
 
tommckenzie.dk


 

tom mckenzie

 

tom mckenzie


TALENTS

anna badur

anna badur

Design Academy Eindhoven graduate Anna Badur is an independent Designer based in Berlin. Having studied Contextual Design she has created several industrial design projects that reflect her style, her ideas and her view on design. Her ability to create art and design from everyday simple materials makes her work unique and lets us see design from a new angle in an un-expecting way. All her projects so far belong to her master thesis, which was generally about the idea of using natural influences in design processes.

 

Her latest project „Drawn by Nature“, awarded with the iF concept design award 2013, is where natural forces meet because the environment in which it exists shapes everything in the natural world. Since natural forces and weather conditions form Landscapes, and organisms adapt to their natural habitats, she explored the northwestern Germany, her home turf. There, water and wind have a dominant effect both on the landscape and on the human condition. It has a melancholic beauty, which offers room for poetry and creation.

These most essential elements oft he region became Anna’s media and is a study of its aesthetic potential.

Her 100% cotton textiles (washable up to 40°C) are made of blue pigments that were blown over the wet fabric, by the wind making it result into unique patterns and an end result is directly determined by the process.

 

She exhibited during last Dutch Design Week in Eindhoven a collection of all kind of experiments to give the viewer an inside look into the processes.

 

“I’m interested in how design can take advantage of integrating natural forces in the process of creation”.

annabadur.de

 

anna badur

 

anna badur

 

anna badur


TALENTS

katherine mavridis

 

 

A ribbon or a rope can create endless possibilities. They are symbols of connecting or binding things together, which therefore represents relationships, bonds, safety or communication. But yet they can evoke a feeling of being constricted or restrained. A simple rope serves on it’s own as a linear object with no limitations.
 
A challenge of exploring the ways of transforming a linear material into three-dimensional objects has been executed from folk basketry up to fashion. Researching the spatial possibilities of the coiling method that are influenced by masonry construction.
 
Australian knitwear designer Katherine Mavridis, is most interested in exploring the textural qualities of clothing. These ideas then transform within her knits from a 'rhythmic' perspective, creating dynamic textural and sculptural structures which 'pulsate' around the body. Her Mokuba collection was sponsored by luxury Japanese trim and ribbon company, Mokuba.

“Initially inspired by one of their amazing ribbon samples I received from their New York store. This led me to explore traditional rustic techniques of coiled basket making and sculpting. My research led me to explore more modern examples of basket making as I looked to other inspiration sources such as Brooklyn based designer Doug Johnston who constructs amazing coiled bags, purses and baskets out of rope. I went on to develop a way of shaping the pieces around the contours of the body, eventuating in fully-fashioned pieces. “
 
Her collection relies on a new technique, creating clothing with only utilizing-coiled rope, a new technique to be explored in fashion.
 
Chloe Sos
 
katherinemavridis.com


 

photos by Banjo McLachlan

 

photos by Banjo McLachlan

 

photos by Banjo McLachlan

 

photos by Banjo McLachlan

 

photo by Banjo McLachlan


TALENTS

moriel dezaldeti

Design by Moriel Dezaldeti- photo by Lior

 

Moriel Dezaldeti is a graduate of the Textile Design Department at the Shenkar College of Engineering and Design - Israël. During her studies, Dezaldeti found a refuge in knitting as an intimate and meditative act which provided her a quiet place and a form of expression. Dezaldeti believes that through knitting she can express her vision to the world; she examines body movement compared to textile and produces images of the inward body through search and great curiosity of the human body.

Through the transition between the two dimensional and three dimensional,Dezaldeti explores the material, listen to it and let's it be what it is and so breathes life into it. As a designer, she puts emphasizes on handmade works and mainly works with a manual knitting machine. With the same machine she has developed a technique that combines textile knitting and weaving elements, this is how she manages to embrace a variety of colorful and unique textures.

 

pantarhie.blogspot.fr

Design Moriel Dezaldeti - Photo Leonid Padrul, © Eretz Israel Museum, Tel Aviv

 

Design Moriel Dezaldeti

 

Design Moriel Dezaldeti- Photo Leonid Padrul

 

Design Moriel Dezaldeti

 

Design Moriel Dezaldeti

 

Design Moriel Dezaldeti

 

Design Moriel Dezaldeti

 

Design Moriel Dezaldeti - Photo by Lior

 


TALENTS

lev khesin

Khesin’s unique technique of multiple layers of silicone, colored differently, and to be placed one above the other after a long process is an intriguing process of art. His will to obtainable form is accompanied by his humility in virtue of natural processes. Evidently Lev Khesin compares painting to the art of archery and other Zen rituals: When applying each new layer, he focuses exclusively on this one action, thus making them an exercise in controlled presence of mind. The image is the evidence for an accomplished meditation.
 

The light penetrates the transparent material: colored layers shine through, shimmer and shine.

They mix and oscillate in its various shades depending on the position of the viewer and depending on the time of day. A single beam of light can bring a deeper color to glow, let it glow mysteriously diffuse or disperse. The boundaries between the individual color fields are never clearly perceived, since there are no faces, but only depths from which ascends a color.
 
The secret lies in the artist’s technique managing to give the color and the material a twist. The original substance manifests itself in the pictures, but the man who has left his trace here .
 
www.levkhesin.de

 

 

 


TALENTS

christa van der meer

by christa van der meer

 

Christa van der Meer is a Dutch fashion designer and graduated from the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague. Experiencing with different mediums she now works on projects to find ways to connect her portrait drawings to her fashion designs. Her graduation collection she portraits the fact that drawing is essential for designing. The drawings form the base of her fashion collections and is an instrument to create a new perspective both visually and emotionally.
 

Since faces define the identity of a person, Christa uses this intriguing factor as inspiration.

After an intense research into the relation between her love and fascination for portraits and passion for designing fashion stands a collection which merges the two. In addition her studies are intriguing collages which tell a story. Her approach to her silhouettes, using them as portraits and her materials as a frame to the face she lets us see a new world.
 
The combination of the exotic prints make her collections a piece of art. Wrapping her silhouettes in different cultures allows a new global silhouette to be born and gives us new ideas how to incorporate new fabrics in various prints.
 
A new urban nomad.

 

christavandermeer.com 

 

 

by christa van der meer


TALENTS

agustina bottoni

 

 

glow

photo by Roberto Niño Betancourt

Agustina Bottoni is an Argentinian product designer. After graduating at the University of Buenos Aires and working as a fashion designer, she moved to Italy to pursuit a master’s degree in product design at the Nuova Accademia di Belle Arti (NABA) in Milan. Her main goal is to develop skills to become an integral designer.Currently she is an exchange student at Willem the Kooning Academy in Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

 

"Glow Set" is a luminous tea brewing. The aim of the project is to maximize the luminance and heat potential of a small candle. The tea set celebrates the process of slow tea making while showing it through a light effect, becoming a decorative object that brings a pleasant moment of contemplation.

The spherical shape of the glass bottle acts as a lens, magnifying the light of the candle, and showing the beauty of the tea.

Tea can be brewed slowly in 3 to 4 hours or can be used to maintain the infusion hot. The flask rotates in every direction for serving the tea. The strainer fits the cup, which has a cork sleeve as thermal insulation.

This set is carefully handcrafted in turned wood, cork and borosilicate glass.

 

agustinabottoni.com

 

glow

photo by Roberto Niño Betancourt

 

glow

photo by Roberto Niño Betancourt


TALENTS

philipp weber

 

Philipp Weber was born in Munster, Westphalia in 1987. During his studies at the Design Academy Eindhoven in the Netherlands he explored various media and materials, always fascinated by language, music and craftsmanship.

 

In 'Creation of a strange Symphony'  Weber portrays the performance of a glassblower using a new and unusual tool.

 

Pivotal to this work was Webers desire to discover the world of a glassblower. In Belgium he was able to watch glassblower Christophe Genard working with the hot material. The designer questioned himself, ‘How can I inspire his interest to work with me?'. Genards most important tool, the blowing pipe, caught Webers attention. In the past 2000 years only minor alterations have been made to the 1.5m long steel pipe, with no effect to the material. ‘What would happen to the glass, if the function of this tool radically changed? How would Christophe adapt to a new pipe?’.

 

And so, by manipulating the pipe, he took influence on the inner shaping of the glass.

Simultaneously to this process, Weber also sensed a strong rhythm and musicality in the way Genard was working on the glass.

The pipe as a tool for glass production, appeared to be like a musical instrument to him. He could not resist the idea to translate the mechanism of a trumpet into an application for blowing glass. Together with an engineer and the knowledge from preceding experiments for a new tool, he worked on an ‘instrument’– an allegoric bond of craft and music–, inspiring Genard to ‘improvise’ the glass, to start a dialogue with the material. Playing the valves, Genard would shape the glass from inside, activating different air streams.

 

The transformation of the pipe into an instrument provoked a performance of glass making. A short-movie, several glass objects and the instrument itself communicate this dance with the fire.

 

 

The musical rhythm of the glass workmanship emerges and unveils a new facet. An old craft can be experienced with a new sensibility and poses the question how design can change well-known patterns and processes without destroying the essence of the craft.With A Strange Symphony, he received the DMY Berlin New Talent Award 2013.

 

www.philippweber.org

 

 

philipp weber

philipp weber

philipp weber


TALENTS

qiyun deng

Image ECAL/Qiyun Deng

Image ECAL/Qiyun Deng

 

Agrarian consciousness – how food is grown and harvested, and where it comes from – has been rising steadily for the last decade. Sustained interest in sustainable agriculture, energy and consumer products has also garnered a great deal of time and attention from top designers and innovators.

 

Product designer, Qiyun Deng has interpreted these matrices of agriculture, design and ecology in the form of biodegradable tableware for his diploma project at ECAL, in Switzerland. Made of bioplastic PLA, Deng's project, Graft is a testament to the inherent artistry of nature's colors and textures. Merging form and function, Deng modeled his bio-untensils after common fruits and vegetables. His project honors beautiful design and the moral imperative to live consciously and sustainably.

 

The briefing for this project was to uplift disposable products by introducing a "haptic" quality, such as texture or color. Deng noticed that the texture and shape of fruits and vegetables could be applied to everyday artifacts: for example, a celery stem made sense for a handle; a petal of artichoke was perfect for the bowl of a spoon; and one half of a honey melon would make a bowl fit for the human palm.

Textures were copied by various techniques including 3D printing; and then parts were joined together by a grafting technique that is also commonly used in horticulture. The final prototypes were finished at the school workshop by using two parts of polyurethane resin with different colors.

 

Qiyun Deng leaves his audience with one final thought: "Will you throw them away easily?"

 

Beth Lauk

 

Qiyun Deng

 

Beth Lauck contributes bi-monthly posts about emerging and disruptive design and communications trends, and helps forecast why and how these changes will affect market intelligence. She also maintains a blog devoted to the intersections between fashion, future studies and trend science. She completed an internship with Trend Union in 2012 as the Assistant Editor and Community Manager of Trend Tablet, and considers her experiences with the Trend Union team an invaluable addition to her work as a trend forecaster and fashion theorist. 

 

Beth's blog

 

Image ECAL/Qiyun Deng

Images ECAL/Qiyun Deng

 

Image ECAL/Qiyun Deng

Image ECAL/Qiyun Deng

 

Image ECAL/Qiyun Deng

Images ECAL/Qiyun Deng

 

Image ECAL/Qiyun Deng

Image ECAL/Qiyun Deng

 

Image ECAL/Qiyun Deng

Image ECAL/Qiyun Deng

 


TALENTS

stéphanie baechler

photos stéphanie baechler

Stéphanie Baechler is a trained textile and fashion designer who graduated from the College of Art and Design in Lucerne, Switzerland. She was nominated in 2009 for her thesis for the Design Prize Switzerland and has already won various other design awards in her young career. Curious, imaginative and courageous, she incorporates art and contemporary topics in her designs, forging intuitive understanding with conceptual imagination. She not only works by hand but also uses the computer, to follow a playful process of deconstruction and reassembly to derive at fresh perspectives on seemingly familiar themes and forms. The transition to a three-dimensional approach required in fashion design set off a chain of developments in her thinking which started off as an exploration of the mineral world, her graduation collection eventually researched elegance in relationship to the space we occupy in the world, both in a physical sense and psychologically, socially and politically.

Her surreal world is a manipulation of textiles and invites us to see textile from a complete different angle. Her main inspiration originates from minerals. Dug up from the earth and grounds to glaze components and pigments, in her vision they mysteriously regain their solid state on the surface of the fired pieces, adding durability, colour and brilliance to the work. With a main focus on rocks, gems and ores, studying their varying substance densities she creates wearable minerals.

 

" In negotiating this disparity, transition and transformation are essential: stone becomes fabric, modelled to follow the body while it is moving and to turn the figure into sculpture as soon as it comes to rest – suggesting an effortless, casual flow from fashion to art and back again. Several elements taken from the mineral world return into the design. "

 

 

www.stephaniebaechler.com

 

photo stéphanie baechler

 

photos stéphanie baechler


TALENTS

crossover collective

 

photo by Louise te Poele

 

 

Floor Nijdeken recently graduated at Artez institute of Arts Arnhem, The Netherlands in Product Design. His latest project is called Crossover Collective and we just love it.

 

Floor explains us his project : "The Crossover Collective intends to redress social relationships. My main focus lies in activating and mobilizing people. I designed the conditions in which social structures can grow and bloom, and the initiative of users is stimulated. With myself as an intermediary and my table as a medium, I let participants find out that working together stimulates mutual trust, understanding and positive energy.

 

In today's society there is a lot of knowledge (created), but how is this knowledge passed on? Young people get their knowledge from books and the Internet, while the elderly and their heritage disappear. Society is changing and people are suspicious of spontaneity and communication with each other. People increasingly withdraw into their own privacy ‘bubble' while society, perhaps more than ever, actually is in need of real social exchange.

Collect moments, not things.

 

My social machine focuses on an ancient form of communication and social activity: collective embroidery. With my machine the viewer is an active part of the installation, where transfer of ‘heritage’ (a collection of behavior, knowledge, expertise, skills, memories, core values and sentiment) that you leave in your environment is the central theme. The embroidered carpet is the silent witness of the numerous short encounters, and the visitor created a positive memory to cherish."

 

www.floornijdeken.nl

 

photo by Louise te Poele

 

photos by Louise te Poele

 

 

photos by Louise te Poele

 

photo by Louise te Poele

 

 


TALENTS

alexa lixfeld

 

Alexa Lixfeld photos by Dietlind Wolf

Alexa Lixfeld photos by Dietlind Wolf

 

 

Alexa Lixfeld is a design studio, consultancy and production company, based in Hamburg, Germany. Set up in 2008, its portfolio ranges over a great variety of projects, from tableware and cashmere products to children’s dolls and a fragrance. What these projects have in common is that they reach far beyond the strictly commercial: the limited series and one-offs that result from Lixfeld‘s interventions are first and foremost meant to be statements, processes and experiments where interaction is central, where new relationships are woven, and where the improbable is more than possible.

 

The present series of glass pieces, GlassWood, which was premiere in Milan in April 2013, perfectly fits Lixfeld‘s approach. The glass elements were handmade and mouth-blown in a workshop in Novy Bor, a small town in the Czech Republic, between the Lusatian Mountains and Central Bohemia, famous for its history of glass production. The glass tradition still survives in hundreds of small factories in the surrounding villages. When confronted with their techniques, Lixfeld decided to celebrate them by combining the glass with the wooden molds that lend it their form in the blowing process.

“I was struck by the relationship that grows during production between these beautiful oak molds and the hot glass, each leaving its mark on the other,“ says Lixfeld. “Upcycling and working with existing forms has always been a point of interest to me. These molds, just fuel for the kilns after they were discarded, had a beauty of their own, which is never seen. Keeping the glass pieces and their molds together once the production was over offered me an opportunity to put that beauty on display. It also provided a much greater tension to the glass, because of the contrast in texture between its shiny and colorful skin and the worn out appearance of the mold. It equally gave me the opportunity to show the process that led to the finalized product.

Our production has always been non-industrial, away from the standard and norm. GlassWood is no exception: each duo comes a perfect couple, with a unique identity. I re-use an old mold to serve as a base for one glass object. It creates a unique mold-glass combination, and you cannot have the same coupling twice.”

 

Lixfeld sees her work as an open process, a collaborative action that allows for coincidence and surprises, incidents and accidents. In the GlassWood project she had her project guided by objets trouvés – the molds that she found and used untouched- and the craftsmanship of the artisans by whom the glass objects were blown.

“I chose the color of the glass, and decided where and how to cut it, but after that the project became an interaction with the surroundings, finding potential in what was given, working hands-on with the artisans. My work is essentially about bringing together what is already there, but which remained disconnected. A great number of designers start from scratch, and then define the product in every detail. If you take that as a norm, I’m less a product designer than a process designer, a curator and facilitator, someone who makes things possible.”

 

Max Borka

 

www.alexalixfeld.com

 

Alexa Lixfeld photos by Dietlind Wolf

Alexa Lixfeld photos by Dietlind Wolf

 

Alexa Lixfeld photos by Dietlind Wolf

Alexa Lixfeld photos by Dietlind Wolf

 

Alexa Lixfeld photos by Dietlind Wolf

Alexa Lixfeld photos by Dietlind Wolf


TALENTS

arturo erbsman

 

polar-light

 

Arturo Erbsman, freshly graduated from ENSAD- Ecole des Arts Déco- lives and works in Paris, France. Water, fire, wind, light, gravity, temperature, are his working tools. Erbsman works with natural phenomenons and try to create links between manufactured objects and the four elements of Nature.

 

Polar Light is a project realized in Lapland in Winter 2012 and presented at Salone Satellite - Milan 2013.It is a poetic ice chandelier, result of human conception and nature’s intervention.Designed to be hung from a branch of a tree in winters, it is composed of a metal structure covered with soft white woven fishnet that catches water in all its forms.

 

At dawn, when the morning dew deposits micro droplets on the surface it gradually freezes and turn into stalactites. Over course of the day, the structure stiffens coated with ice.  At nightfall, it glows as rays pass through the ice, thus highlighting the beauty and delicacy of crystallization of water.

This ephemeral work of nature exudes a timeless boreal light.This faraway, atmospheric light reinterprets a crystal baroque chandelier. It sees water, frost and ice as functional materials, and enhances each of their aesthetic, ecological and structural qualities. This project considers factors of climate as potential drivers that can interact with manmade objects.

 

It is the first result of an ongoing experimental research on relationship between manufactured objects and the four elements of nature.

 

www.arturoerbsman.com

 

 

 


TALENTS

maximilian löw

maximilian löw

 

Maximilian Löw is a young designer from Weißenburg, Germany, studying Integrated Design at the University of the Arts in Bremen. His work focuses on objects for everyday life, with a playful handling of materials and design in different fields.

 

One project, titled Edged—Cutlery, combines the elegant soft curves of classic cutlery with sharp, rigorous edges. Cast in bronze, the set is designed to achieve a balance of ergonomics and aesthetics.

 

On his process, Maximilian states that “It is my impulse to question the essence of objects and to try to get to the bottom of them. Therefore it is really important to experiment and work practically.”

The designer’s work also includes Edged—Lamp, a one meter long pendant lamp made from a single sheet of stainless steel. The design process involved the creation of a paper model before the final result was achieved.

 

Another inventive and playful project is Cake Server, in which the handles for the cake plate are removable and become serving utensils. The sleek design is accentuated by an elegantly curved handle.

 

Maximilian will be graduating from his program this summer. We hope to see more from this talented young designer.

 

maxloew.com

 

maximilian löw

 

maximilian löw

 

maximilian löw

 

maximilian löw

 

maximilian löw

 

 


TALENTS

julian vassallo

photo by julian vassallo

 

Camilla Bo’ is an Italian freelance journalist and stylist. After two years of study in Paris she returned to her native Rome to study architecture. The art of critique proved more fruitful for Camilla and she began to write for the Association of Art and Critic about art and design and on her personal blog Choufouchouf. Focusing on the relation and communication between fashion and art, she decided to follow her creative nature not only giving a voice to the library she has on her laptop but also as inspiration for editorials. She’s now based in London, attending the course of «Art Direction for Fashion» at the Central Saint Martins College of Art.

 

 

It has been just one year since this young architect started to devote himself to photography.

 

He spent his childhood behind science books and numbers, then later joined an architecture course where he was also introduced to the camera for the first time.

Architecture has taught him so much about balance, form, colour and so many other skills which he now apply to his photography, creating his own personal language.

 

The photographers whose work he admires most are Kris Micallef, the surreal works of  Alex Stottard and Brooke Shaden and the poetic scenario of Sarah Ann Loreth. But his stronger influence comes from fantasy movies set in fantasy worlds.

I asked him about the picture with the men’s head covered by flowers. I think this picture is so powerful thanks to the contrast between the male subject and the grace of pink flowers. I was wondering  how the concept was born and if it is part of a project…

“I remember watching fencing on the television and thinking to myself that the masks the Olympians wear were so cool and mysterious. I usually always try to find some connection between the relationship that us humans have with nature, so I thought I would try replicate the fencing mask with beautiful, graceful flowers. It is definitely part of an ongoing project that I wish to continue once I graduate from university!”

 

Fascinated by eclectic references, this young architect is able to filter out unnecessary excess and contrived structures through his camera lens, and communicate only the grace and lightness that he experiences in his inner world.

 

 

Julian Vassallo

 

 

Camilla Bo' s website

 

photo by julian vassallo

 

photo by julian vassallo

 

photo by julian vassallo

 

photo by julian vassallo


TALENTS

sabatina leccia

 

sabatina leccia "eat the world up"- "Haemorrhage"

sabatina leccia "eat the world up"- "Haemorrhage"

 

Sabatina Leccia is a 28 years old independent eco-designer based in Paris. "Eat Up The World" her master project at Saint Martins  is a visual metaphor aiming to communicate that we are consuming too much too fast.

 

Through the invention and reinterpretation of existing objects, two collections of products were created: Haemorrhage and Fragile Breath. Each project is designed to visualise a specific set of data or specific material scenario. Through exploring methods of ‘designed destruction’ and removing calculated portions of material, Sabatina aims also to question if we can design in a more material-efficient way.

In a time of unparalleled material scarcity and increasing population she hopes to use design as a communicative vehicle to visualise the urgent need to reconsider the patterns and speed of our consumption, and bringing these broader global issues closer to home.

 

“Eat The World Up” is located within the table landscape, aiming to underline the notion we are ‘eating’ our planet’s resources.

 

 

www.sabatinaleccia.com

 

 

sabatina leccia "eat the world up"- "Haemorrhage"

sabatina leccia "eat the world up"- "Haemorrhage"

 

sabatina leccia "eat the world up"- "Haemorrhage"

sabatina leccia "eat the world up"- "Haemorrhage"

 

sabatina leccia "eat the world up"-"Fragile Breath"

sabatina leccia "eat the world up"-"Fragile Breath"

 

sabatina leccia "eat the world up"-"Fragile Breath"

sabatina leccia "eat the world up"-"Fragile Breath"

 

sabatina leccia "eat the world up"-"Fragile Breath"

sabatina leccia "eat the world up"-"Fragile Breath"

 


TALENTS

guillaume dénervaud

 

Guillaume Dénervaud

guillaume dénervaud photo by valérie probst

 

 

Guillaume Dénervaud (1987) lives and works between Romont and Vevey in Switzerland.

Abstract intricate drawings on the colorful canvas exemplifies Guillaume's intense exploration of the medium, which is inspired by early modernism and the aesthetics of abstraction in contemporary culture. The artist is currently developing an ongoing edition project entitled G-GAZET during a residency at the Cité Internationale des Arts de Paris.

During the presentations of Nomadism, our Summer 2014 forecast in Paris, Guillaume created a spontaneous work upon the canvas in our main salon that we wish to share.

 

 

 

guillaume denervaud

 

 

guillaume dénervaud

guillaume dénervaud

 

guillaume dénervaud

guillaume dénervaud

 

guillaume dénervaud  photo by valérie probst

guillaume dénervaud photo by valérie probst

 

guillaume dénervaud

guillaume dénervaud

 

guillaume dénervaud

guillaume dénervaud

 

guillaume dénervaud

guillaume dénervaud 's spontaneous work in our headquarter in paris


TALENTS

dienke dekker

 

photo by dienke dekker

photo by dienke dekker

 

My name is Dienke Dekker and I am a 4th year student at the Design Academy Eindhoven in Holland.

 

I think that different properties of materials offer a great opportunity to express ambience, tactility and feel of objects. In my work I love to experiment with these properties and to create objects with a strong emphasis on craftsmanship and detail.

The basket weaving craft has been the inspiration for this project about imitation and reinterpretation of crafts.

 

From imitation of bamboo structure, the step was made to silkscreen printing on silk and other textiles with custom paint stamps, resulting in a series of archetypical objects.

 

To contact Dienke

 

 

photos dienke dekker

photos dienke dekker

 

photos dienke dekker

photos dienke dekker

 

photos dienke dekker

photos dienke dekker

 

photos dienke dekker

photos dienke dekker

 

photos dienke dekker

photos dienke dekker

 

photos dienke dekker

photos dienke dekker


TALENTS

yuval azili

photo yuval azili

photo yuval azili

 

Yuval Azili is 26 years old , he lives in Israel and just graduated Academy of Art and Design Bezalel, photography department.

 

"The majority of nature's creations where created in couples – as many of the human organs, so can a fetus be created in couples, transforming from semen and ovum to cells sorting process. I have a twin brother. To be a part of a couple and experience everything together is a big advantage in life, the bond, created in the womb, I cannot explain but it has affected me tremendously in consolidating my personality and my self-esteem. Growing with a twin brother can sometimes lead to loss of identity, loss of the individual's oneself, starting from identical clothing, celebrating birthdays together until getting the first summons for the army.

 

Our names – Yuval and Gal always called together, so are the wings, dependent on each other in order to fly. Chicken wings symbolize purity, sanctity and immature manhood. By using wings in different forms I am trying to express the sacrifice, sacrificing and death, sometimes, African cultural symbols. Working with wings as a material, intrigues me, it is a live-dead material.

Wings allow me to show the clean outline, saint as angel wings. However, the use of wings in my photographs does not wishes to express the above-mentioned. Moreover, the wings in my photographs always wishes to symbol the rooster's slaughter as part of the food industry – an unseen stage.

 

Photographing control and loss of control interest me; expressed as human control of animals for instance, such as training or butchery.  In the still nature photograph with the bed, I have built a construction out of 250 chicken wings, which comes out as a peacock's tail. The magnificent peacock tail has survived through evolution and has preserved, even though it lessens the peacock survival abilities and according to evolutionary history should have not survived. What allowed it to stay was mating issue; tail is presented to females at the reproduction period and the most beautiful, impressive male gets to have offsprings. The impressive tail symbolizes manhood, power and control, however, It also symbolize vulnerability, femininity and care."

 

to contact Yuval

 

 

photo yuval azili

photo yuval azili

 

photo yuval azili

photo yuval azili

 

photo yuval azili

photo yuval azili

 

photo yuval azili

photo yuval azili

 


TALENTS

ingrid hulskamp

 

photo by arnout hulskamp

photo by arnout hulskamp

 

27-year-old Dutch designer Ingrid Hulskamp describes herself as a 'design poet'. "My aim is to enchant people with the use of poetic, playful and sophisticated design."

Here are her words to describe her Toys for contemplation :"To pursue time for daily contemplation in an intuitive way, I have developed a series of contemplative toys for adults. The luxurious objects, made from hand-blown glass, remind us of the candid fun we had as a child, when we were able to fully get caught up in the moment.

In order for the toys to catch our attention and create a poetic moment in time, I have created three different sensory experiences: a tactile experience using hand-blown glass, wood, brass plated gold and textiles; a visual experience using coloured pigments that transform when you start playing with the object; a sonic experience through the movement of water and glass balls."

 

www.ingridhulskamp.com

 

 

 

 

 

photo by arnout hulskamp

photo by arnout hulskamp

 

photo by arnout hulskamp

photo by arnout hulskamp


TALENTS

elisa strozyk

 

photo courtesy of elisa strozyk

photo courtesy of elisa strozyk

 

When you think about designed object, lot of super famous designers and object came into your mind, but the essence of design is more about innovation of shapes and matters, then it can become part of our culture.

 

That's exactly what Elisa Strozyk is making, turning wood into flexible textile : surprising and playful way to use this material ! The outcome is really fantastic, and shows us that innovation is still part of the game, using traditional material to create new forms, reconnecting us to real feelings and a new tactile experience.

 

As she explained the world around us is becoming immaterial, with all the way we have to communicate with people, by mail, messages, calls, using internet to live, buy, get informations of the world : a society of pictures and waves. The place for printed and matters is becoming tiny, but making it luxury and precious.

 

And that's what she want : "Giving importance to surfaces that are desirable to touch can reconnect us with the material world and enhance the emotional value of an object."

There is also a part of  earth care in her work process, as she said "Another way to save resources is working with reused or recycled objects and material waste. Also it is crucial to aim for a closer relationship between subject and object.This can be achieved through more flexibility and changeability, the possibility of growth or surprising elements. In the future we will have to deal with more waste and less resources. Therefore it is fundamental to be aware about life cycles of objects. That means to use material that is able to grow old beautifully. "

 

Born in Berlin, Strozyk studied at prominent arts colleges at a young age, ENSAD (Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Arts Décoratifs) in Paris and KHB (Kunsthochschule Berlin-Weissensee) in Berlin, before she received her masters in Future Textile Design from London’s Central Saint Martins in 2009.

 

There is no doubt the young woman is particularly well-qualified when it comes to design pedigree, but it is the artistry, originality and use of symbolism, in which her works and approach display a depth and maturity beyond her years, considering she is only 28 years old, –and is already capturing hearts and minds the world over.

 

Caroline Aufort

 

www.elisastrozyk.de

 

 

photo courtesy of elisa strozyk

photo courtesy of elisa strozyk

 

photo courtesy of elisa strozyk

photo courtesy of elisa strozyk

 

photo courtesy of elisa strozyk

photo courtesy of elisa strozyk

 

photo courtesy of elisa strozyk

photo courtesy of elisa strozyk

 

photo courtesy of elisa strozyk

photo courtesy of elisa strozyk

 

photo courtesy of elisa strozyk

photo courtesy of elisa strozyk

 

photo courtesy of elisa strozyk

photo courtesy of elisa strozyk

 

photo courtesy of elisa strozyk

photo courtesy of elisa strozyk

 

photo courtesy of elisa strozyk

photo courtesy of elisa strozyk


TALENTS

elisa van joolen

 

design by elisa van joolen

design by elisa van joolen

Sample (SS 2012, produced 07/21/2011), donated, sent from Beaverton to Brooklyn

1/1 must Showroom Sample (date unknown, most likely SS 2012), donated, Midtown NYC

Garment (date unknown, most likely SS 2011), acquired at a Warehouse sale, Chelsea NYC

 

 

Elisa Van Joolen is a recent graduate of the newly initiated MFA Fashion Design and Society program at Parsons The New School for Design. Her graduate work 11” X 17”, was an installation that specifically challenged the confines of conventional fashion collections.

Elisa embarked on a collaborative project whereby she requested and acquired sample garments from industry giants, (Nike, Banana Republic and Calvin Klein, to name a few), as well as sourcing from local stores and independents. She longed to create a collection with multiple entities and brands, like a wardrobe.

 

Through the process of cutting into these pieces, Elisa created several new assemblages lending itself to a collection in sum.

As a result of this process, garments that had already been deemed complete were given new life and each purposeful cut gave way to an array of beautiful abstractions.

 

Elisa will be showing at New York Fashion week in September 2012 which will provide a new perspective on her work 11” X 17” as it translates from an exhibition context to runway.

 

Madeleine Harman

 

www.elisavanjoolen.com

 

 

 

design by elisa van joolen

design by elisa van joolen

 Garment (date unknown), acquired at Salvation Army, Brooklyn

Limited Edition Piece (SS 2012), acquired at high-end store, Soho NYC


TALENTS

valeriya olkhova

 

 photos by alina berezenko

photos by alina berezenko

 

 

"My aesthetic evolves around fusion; contrast of techniques, materials and inspiration. I concentrate on combining traditional, hand and innovative approach to knit, such as using horse hair, untreated alpaca, berries home made dyes. I am fundamentally inspired by non physical subjects; psychology & sociology, however, natures ' multi dimensional elements: such as evolution, preservation, decay.

Texture, remains a source of fascination and often a backbone of visual and textural moodboards.

Currently I am living  in Kiev & preparing for a summer internship  in Copenhagen."

 

www.valeriyaolkhova.com

 

 

 photos by alina berezenko

photos by alina berezenko

 

 photos by alina berezenko

photos by alina berezenko

 

 photos by alina berezenko

photos by alina berezenko

 


TALENTS

daniel costa

 

 

 

photo by daniel costa

photo by daniel costa

 

Daniel Costa is a design poet who hails from the Tyrol. Like a breath of fresh mountain air, his endearing personal style and enchanting optimism mix freely with his creative skills and mature sense of beauty.

 

After studying at the Design Academy Eindhoven, Daniel completed an internship at Studio Edelkoort in Paris, where he immersed himself in the city to redefine his work and expand his identity. In Self-reference, Daniel has responded to the organic grains of a found piece of wood before taking it on a journey of transformation to create a series of contemporary fossils.

 

The contextual designer explains:

"I found a tree trunk in the forest, which was cut every 50cm. A very pragmatic human interaction with the tree as a movement in time and space. I take this found piece and give it a more sensitive shape. Following the grain, the structure, the architecture of the tree. I cast the new shape in ceramic to observe the qualities of this shape in a different material.

The shape is still human – I start to burn and brush it. The grain comes out and the smooth shape starts to have a structure that is logic towards the shape. Again I cast the new shape in ceramic. I burn the shape even more. Deformation. Cast in ceramic. I sand the grain structure away to observe the deformation – anew burning the shape and casting. Anew sanding and observing the deformation...

 

Autonomous shapes arise that refer to themselves and their origin; shapes and surfaces that need contexts in our world. They show us potentials and new design qualities but also a strong relation to our body. It is a research that evokes an archaic quality that seems to harmoniously combine the contradictions of us humans in our troubled world with the roots of our existence. An alchemistic approach to design and our contradicting lifestyle. My longing for tactility and structure. My wish to appreciate the complex beauty of the most elementary things."

 

 

daniel-costa.com

 

 

photo by daniel costa

photo by daniel costa

 

photo by daniel costa

photo by daniel costa

 

photo by daniel costa

photo by daniel costa

 

photo by daniel costa

photo by daniel costa

 

photo by daniel costa

photo by daniel costa

 

photo by daniel costa

photo by daniel costa

 

photo by daniel costa

photo by daniel costa

 

photo by daniel costa

photo by daniel costa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


TALENTS

lee schein

 

photos courtesy of lee schein

photos courtesy of lee schein

 

Lee Schein is recently graduated in visual communications and illustration from the Wizo Academy of Design, Israel.

 

Her final project called "Wild Realms" is an anthropology work about fictional civilization of warriors. Her world is inhabited by strange creatures, well-dressed and accessorized.They look perfect, between Tim Burton and African Art.

Even more impressive in real, her silk-screen printed figures are 2 meters high! "Wild Realms" was showed with a wall of miscellaneous "remains": dental clay models, handmade felt pieces and few pairs of feet made from a mixture of sawdust and mud. Schein's major interests are illustration and wearable art.

 

Caroline Aufort

 

www.leeschein.com

photos courtesy of lee schein

photos courtesy of lee schein

 

photos courtesy of lee schein

photos courtesy of lee schein

 

photos courtesy of lee schein

photos courtesy of lee schein

 

photos courtesy of lee schein

photos courtesy of lee schein

 

 

photos courtesy of lee schein

photos courtesy of lee schein


TALENTS

jungeun lee

 

jungeun lee

Photo by b. lee

 

Jungeun Lee has been experimenting and researching unconventional methods of garment construction. She is a recent graduate of London’s Royal College of Art (2011) with an M.A. in Mixed Media/Textiles.

 

Her process eliminates the need for sewing, cutting or weaving. She wraps synthetic fibers around a desired form, and then uses a heating process that transforms the fiber into a three dimensional molded garment. This technique renders both expected and unexpected silhouettes.

Her zero-waste garments are a significant contribution to the fashion industry. Although her materials are petroleum-based, her process is noteworthy nonetheless. By designing in free form without the vast amounts of waste that traditional methods entail, she is paving the way for future eco-friendly praxes. Text by Beth Lauck.

 

www.studiokoya.com

 

 

jungeun lee

Photo by b. lee


TALENTS

fiona krüger

 

 

Memento Mori by Fiona Kruger

photo by Damien Ropero/ ECAL

Fiona Krüger is a recent graduate from ECAL/University of Arts and Design. Earning her Master’s in Luxury Industry and Design, she presents her final project, Memento Mori. Drawing inspiration from the 17th century skull watch of Mary Queen of Scotts as well as the artwork of Dia de Los Muertos, Krüger worked with key suppliers from the swiss watch industry to have the pieces made and with a watch maker to do the assembly.

The pieces of the dial were layered to mimic the shape of a skull, mirroring the layers that facilitate the movement of a mechanical watch. A devotion to detail and a dedication to the art of craft make this watch a spectacle for the eyes as well as a tribute to luxury horologists of the past, present and future.

 

www.fionakruger.com

 

 

Watch Memento Mori Fiona Kruger Sketchbook

Watch Memento Mori by Fiona Kruger Sketchbook

Memento Mori by Fiona Kruger

photo by Damien Ropero/ ECAL


TALENTS

claire-anne o’brien

design by claire anne o'brien

 

Claire-anne O’Brien — a young, Irish-born, London based-designer and last year’s RCA graduate (MA Textiles) — takes a sculptural approach to textiles. O’Brien is forging a new relationship between textile design and landscape interiors.

Her meticulous praxis uses a combination of hand- and machine-knit stitches.

Without losing our connection to technology, O’Brien’s craft offers a renewed appreciation for artisanal intelligence.

 

www.claireanneobrien.com

 

 

design by claire anne o'brien

 

design by claire anne o'brien


TALENTS

elsa lambinet

 

Elsa Lambinetphoto by ludic owczarz & elsa lambinet

 

Elsa Lambinet is born in 1987 in Nimes, France. After graduating from Design school in France, she decided to live in Australia for a year in order to perfect her english and build upon her professional experience. She sent her application to the ECAL/University of Art and Design from Melbourne and was accepted 2 months later in MAS Luxe.

She was part, as a student,  of the Baccarat/Milan Design Week 2011 as well as Christofle/Designer Days 2011."Don't play with food" is her diploma project : "A new kind of chocolate which can be created according to your taste, thanks to three elements."

www.lambinetelsa.com

 


TALENTS

meriç canatan

 

Meriç Canatan Self Portrait

self portrait

"My name is Meriç Canatan. I was born in 1988 in Turkey. I studied painting in high school.And now ı'm studying fashion and textile design in mimar sinan fine arts university in istanbul. I do love to create-draw-illustrate my world and transform to design-print-cloth.

I always feel close to speechless and undisputed free side of life such as art,design and music. This is what ı do and will be doing in the future."

 

www.flavors.me/mericcanatan#

 

 

 

Meriç Canatan

meriç canatan

 

 

meriç canatan

meriç canatan


TALENTS

masha reva

mashareva

 

"I`m 23, I live and work in Kiev. Past summer I finished MA course Fashion design in Kiev National University of Technology and Design, then I got a couple of internships in studios of  Thakoon and Walter Van Beirendonck. I`m really enjoying to experiment with everything that I could create or change, and a big part of me - is my love to draw and make sketches.

I hope to make an experimental studio to work on different things as illustration, garments and print design and even maybe something else."

 

www.mashareva.com

 

masharevamasharevamasharevamasharevamasharevamashareva


TALENTS

jannis huelsen

Xylinum

photos by Jannis Huelsen

Jannis Huelsen is a young german industrial designer graduated in 2011 from HbK Braunschweig.
Xylinum is a research project that poses the question: what could future materials and production processes be like? The title Xylinum is the name of the bacterium which produces an artificial cellulose material. This bacterium consumes sugar and builds a cellulose fibre structure around any given form. Since the process takes place in a nutrition liquid, the wet material can be dried later on, resulting in a durable and 100 % biodegradable material.

The properties of this material can be adjusted by changing the genetic code of the organisms. In collaboration with the company Jenpolymers, a technique was developed to create a »skin« around a wooden stool frame, forming the coating and seating surface.

 

www.jannishuelsen.com

 

Xylinum

photo by Jannis Huelsen


TALENTS

thos

thos_lucky sweater01

"THOS claims that it is possible to capture the essence of luck into garment. Its underlying thoughts are meant to provoke a discussion and pose an alternative to the current trend logic. In Mongolia, my native country, we believe in an ancient myth that you can charge your spirit and fortune by standing in the dust of our famous horse races. As I explored deeper, the question branched out into: What is luck? What is luxury?And ultimately how are these things connected to humans desire for spirituality?

Due to its nature, part of this project involved a journey to Mongolia where I explored the other, the eastern side. In Mongolia, the project not only got its essence but also got shaped by all the other occurring experiences and influences. The next evolutionary step of luxury in the west will be intangible."

A graduation project by Tschagsalmaa Borchuu

www.thos.mn

 

thos-modell02.zellner

 

 


TALENTS

sarah mesritz

sarah mesritz

 

The designer behind SMJD is Sarah Mesritz, she graduated in 2008 from the Academy of Fine Arts in Maastricht. After several projects and internships in Amsterdam and New York, Sarah started her own jewellery label in the fall of 2010. The collection is made of 100% cotton rope, knotted and crocheted in different patterns.

During Milan 2011 SMJD presented, 25 meters of jewellery.
Create your own design with jewellery per meter and combine different elements of knotted or crochet rope.

 

www.smjd.nl

 

 

sarah mesritz


Name says :
2011-07-08 07:16:47
MANDY have you seen the work of HAMISH MUNRO in Australia . Check it out !!!
SoLoveLy {decoration} says :
2011-06-22 06:34:40
c'est beau !


TALENTS

christian sarragúa

"My name is Christian Sarragúa. I'm an illustrator, graphic designer and toymaker based in Montevideo in Uruguay."

The Amigurumi is a Japanese technique that allows modeling small sculptures by crochet wool.This technique creates textures and unique volumes for natural and organic pieces.

http://facebook.com/chitysoyyo

http://chitysoyyo.com/

 

 

 

 

photo by raquel kelmanzon

 

photo by raquel kelmanzon


Azede Jean-Pierre says :
2011-04-02 00:37:47
So glad that I found this blog, its is so very cool and informative. I love seeing the wonderful talents that you showcase. -http://uncouturier.blogspot.com/


TALENTS

borre akkersdijk

25 years old, he studied at design academy eindhoven (the netherlands)& FIT N.Y.C.

He is working on his new collection and as a freelance designer in paris.

 

www.byborre.com

 

 

 

photos by marie taillefer

 

 

 

 

 

 

photos by marie taillefer

 


Elena Tacco10 says :
2011-03-29 12:11:58
woh TT. olio per gli ingranaggi della mente e del cuore. grazie. elena.


TALENTS

anna october

Anna October is 20 years old, she is a designer based inUkraine.

Creation and harmony, utility and functionality are main words for understanding Anna's clothing.

 

www.annaoctober.com

annaoktyabr.blogspot.com

 

 

photo by Alina Berezenko style by Dasha Lagenberg

photo by Alina Berezenko style by Dasha Lagenberg

photo by Alina Berezenko style by Dasha Lagenberg


Rosabel says :
2011-05-20 10:36:00
Wow, your post makes mine look felbee. More power to you!