NØRDIC NEWS

copenhagen street food

 

Street food culture is booming all over the world. Small food trucks serve coffee and soup on street corners in Tokyo, New York, London & Sao Paulo and now it manifested itself in a new way on Papirøen - the paper island in Copenhagen.

 

A new part of Copenhagen is beginning to take shape. The concept is to create a space where both food, design & social gatherings can take place. One of the first to open on the Paper Island earlier this year, was Copenhagen Street Food.
 
In the authentic open space warehouse, food trucks are serving fast but well cooked food with taste from many different kitchens. The visitors can get a small piece of for example Mexico in Copenhagen, truly feeling like a world citizen. Also the interior has a modern feeling to it with old containers and other reused materials working as a rustic setting with tables and benches. Since the owners of the space only have a contract to 2017, everything has to be mobile and can be pulled out and relive in a new space. A tendency that fits very well to the lifestyle of being free to roam and wander - a constant mobility.
 
The concept behind Copenhagen Street Food is to make a more available food market for everyone with a contemporary fusion of food styles. It is also compulsory to change the way Danish people are thinking about food and make a new approach to the New Nordic way that has gained so much reputation world wide. It all started of with an idea for a food truck festival, but with the trucks successfully parked inside the warehouse, they might wait 3 years before they hit the road.

On the same small island, fashion and food is merging. After the Danish designer Henrik Vibskov moved his studio to Papirøen, it was obvious to open a cafe, Den plettede gris - the spotted pig, as an extension of his brand. The space is made to create the feeling of being inside a piano, interpreted by the designer with colorful walls and black elastic bands. It is conceptual, creative and a place for connecting work and play while drinking a great cup of coffee. The time is now for bringing talents to the table, gather humans and celebrate the possibility that lay in front of us.
 
When food or coffee is served - what is then not to like? The new innovative spaces on the Paper Island in Copenhagen is symbolizing change and new possibilities. It is all about mobility, creative talent and fusion of styles. A New Nordic way is born.
 
Sara Ingemann Holm-Nielsen
 
Sara Ingemann Holm-Nielsen gives us on a regular basis, chosen fresh news from Scandinavia. Sara is a very sensitive person , in love with trends and style, she is also a talented writer and the brain behind "Quote The Future"

 


 

 

 

 


NØRDIC NEWS

the longest art gallery in the world

photo Angel Trinidad

The Stockholm Metro is home to the world’s longest art gallery. Stockholm’s *tunnelbana* system spans 105.7 kilometres and has 100 metro stations, of which 90 have artworks on display, the oldest coming from the 1950’s. There is no other place where such a long tradition of art or such a huge amount of artworks can be found in a public space. Commuters and visitors are thus able to “go places in the past” and enjoy visually-stimulating contemporary and historical art for free or the price of a metro ticket.

 

The Stockholm metro was opened in 1950, but it was only in 1957 when art in the metro appeared for the first time. A big competition was announced wherein 12 out of 150 entries were selected for T-Centralen station. These artworks can still be seen today.

 

The most striking stations of the Stockholm metro line are the “grotto” stations - cavernous stations left with the bedrock exposed. In the 1960s, the builders decided to spray the blasted rock with a 7-8 cm layer of rendering concrete instead of coating it, resulting in a cave-like ambience. These stations are located in the Blue Line, where the deepest stations can be found almost four stories down.

 

The decorations are very calming in the deepest station in T-Centralen’s Blue Line: giant blue vines stretch across the rocks, a painting by Per Olof Ultvedt - 1975- to help soothe passengers transferring to different trains. Ultvedt also painted light blue silhouettes of men working on the walls as a salute to the many workers who built the station. Each drawing is of an equivalent of a specific engineer, welder, miner or carpenter who helped build T-Centralen.

 

In Kungsträdgården station, the cave-like effect could be felt in its most awe-inspiring glory. It is as if one is transported back in time: the walls are painted in Baroque-abstract style by Swedish artist Ulrik Samuelson - 1977 - and an archeological dig is on display with real artefacts from Sweden’s National Art Museum’s collective. On permanent display here are gas lamps that used to stand on Torsgatan street and marble columns and stone sculptures from the 17th-century Makalös Palace which was stood directly above the station. In addition, one can see and touch natural water from the rocks trickling down on the station’s crude walls, as if inside a cave.

Going forward in time, contemporary art installations dot the Green Line’s underground and aboveground stations. Most notable is Hötorget station which is also known as the “bathroom station” with its teal-coloured tiles and vintage signs. Artist Gun Gordillo added winding neon lights on the ceilings, making for a retro 90s feel. While at Stadion station, a giant rainbow is painted on the blue bedrock, as a commemoration for the 1912 Stockholm Olympics which took place at the nearby Stockholm Stadium.

 

The Stockholm Public Transport is committed to an active working relationship with contemporary artists, even if no new stations are being built. The program “Art in transition” ensures that the inner city stations are still continuing to develop by encouraging temporary exhibitions. The Odenplan station presents works by recent graduates of the Swedish art and design colleges every year, while the Skanstull station screens art films by both Swedish and international artists.

 

Guided art tours, again for free, are available for visitors who would like to know the stories behind the artworks in the metro. This summer  from 3 June to 30 August, English tours are available every Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 15:00 beginning at the SL ticket office at T-Centralen station.

 

Take a day trip, ride the trains and discover the most stunning works of art at the Stockholm metro.

 

Angel Trinidad

 

www.visitsweden.com

 

Angel Trinidad is a writer, editor and ambassador of Dutch and Scandinavian cultures. Born in Manila (1985) with a Scandinavian heart, she has lived in Sweden, Germany, Spain and currently Holland. She specializes on nation branding and the promotion of arts and culture as a way to see the world. Angel has worked as a web editor for Arts Holland and has finished her MA in Euroculture (Georg-August University, Deusto University) with her final thesis on Swedish Indie music and the nation branding of Sweden. She loves listening to music, taking in contemporary art and design, hanging out in cafes and discovering new cities.

 

www.angeltrinidad.me

 

photo Angel Trinidad

 

photo Angel Trinidad

 

photo Angel Trinidad

 

photo Angel Trinidad

 

photo Angel Trinidad

 

photo Angel Trinidad

 

 

 


NØRDIC NEWS

future objects of the season

 

KVADRAT X RAF SIMONS

 

 

There is a growing interest in desirable objects, innovative materials and sophisticated colours this season. The Raf Simons x Kvadrat collaboration is the merge of fashion, fabrics and furniture. The Belgian designer and creative director for Dior woman and the Danish textile company Kvadrat have with the new textile collection created a modern approach to design - rich on colour and texture.
 
The collection is made on the mutual respect of good craftsmanship, based on the well-known innovative approach of Kvadrat and the refined and sophisticated feel of Raf Simons colour palette. The outcome of the collaboration is 11 new fabrics that can be turned into pillows, armrests on chairs & couches. A sneak peak of the fabric collection was shown on the runway at Raf Simon’s “Sterling Ruby” A/W14 men’s wear collection in Paris earlier this year. Some of the coats in the collection were created of more than 75 different patches of fabrics from the Kvadrat collection, launched later this year.

With Kvadrat’s history as the leading manufacturer of furnishing fabrics, since 1968, the company has a long side shown the ability to embrace innovation and pushing the aesthetics, technological and artistic boundaries in both fabrics, colours and the design direction. This innovative design dedication combined with Raf Simon’s background in both industrial and fashion design, gives the collection an aesthetic sensibility and tactility, which adds a touch of newness to the interior scene where furniture meets fashion.
 
The result is simply – future objects for the coming season!

 

Sara Ingemann Holm-Nielsen

 

www.kvadrat.dk

 

Sara Ingemann Holm-Nielsen gives us on a regular basis, chosen fresh news from Scandinavia. Sara is a very sensitive person , in love with trends and style, she is also a talented writer and the brain behind  "Quote The Future"

 
 

KVADRAT X RAF SIMONS


 
 

KVADRAT X RAF SIMONS


NØRDIC NEWS

a single room hotel

hotelcentral

In the unique one-room hotel in central Copenhagen you’ll experience a moment of local roots, digital detox and at the same time be at the inner skirts of the city itself. It is all about: Authenticity! Handcraft! & Re-connection!
 
The Central Hotel & Café is located in one of Copenhagen’s most charming streets in Vesterbro. The owner Leif Thingtved has created a unique one-room hotel on the top of a small café. In the room you will find a unique interior design that will make even the pickiest hotel aficionados feel right at home. There is no doubt a special atmosphere at the old shoemaker’s home, which has now been turned into the smallest hotel in the world.
 
From the first sight it is clear that there has been giving some serious thought and curation into the interior and concept of this classic-style hotel. Everything in the one-room hotel is custom made and the furniture is handcrafted and hand picked. It is local, authentic and unique. A tendency that many urban citizens have been longing for in their everyday lives and still are. It is simple living, but with a very personal touch.

When you have slept in the Royal Eden double bed with Geismar linen it is time for a slow coffee and croissant in the café downstairs alongside with all the locals also getting their morning coffee before jumping on their bike to work. There is a very special community-feeling in the tiny café and it is surely a neighbourhood favourite. A feeling that you can only find certain places in a pulsing city. If you want to restore and re-connect book a single room – it is a simple feeling.
 
Sara Ingemann Holm-Nielsen

 

www.centralhotelogcafe.dk

 

Sara Ingemann Holm-Nielsen gives us on a regular basis, chosen fresh news from Scandinavia. Sara is a very sensitive person , in love with trends and style, she is also a talented writer and the brain behind  "Quote The Future"


 
 
hotelcentral

hotelcentral

hotelcentral

 

hotelcentral

 

hotelcentral


NØRDIC NEWS

couture & craftsmanship

Mette Julie Bundgaard-Nielsen

design by Mette Julie Bundgaard-Nielsen

 

A tendency among younger talented designers is to see the development of making one of a kind creations, where pleat, fold, textural, tactile and the merge of materials from high-tech combined with the natural, reshapes the language of fashion that we know of today.
 

The Scandinavian approach to this merge of couture & craft is seen in the handmade couture pieces made by the Danish designer Mette Julie Bundgaard-Nielsen. The look and feel of the hard and robust butt leather material stands in bright contrast to the very light and sensitive pyramid-shaped bobbin lace, which when combined creates the three-dimensional jacket Reduce. The light colours represent the natural and sustainable materials as an interpretation of the simple and natural style of Scandinavian design, and the traditional craftsmanship in lacemaking.
 

It is the matter of how simple, and yet how complex a design can be that drives Mette Julie Bundgaard-Nielsen in her work. The inspiration draws on neo-modernism and simplicity, as she believes people are yearning for simplicity as the world becomes more complex. In the making of Reduce she challenges both the composition of fibre and weight in materials, as well as the traditional lacemaking methods by using the triangle as a focus point. The unusual geometric shape adds a good proportion of simplicity to the design, though when sewn together with the 200 individual triangles of lace modules, they compose a very complex honeycomb system, which creates the volume of the three-dimensional effect. In order to preserve the voluminous effect, the lace can be detached from the leather shoulders and folded as a sextant.

The vision behind Reduce is grounded in Mette Julie Bundgaard-Nielsen’s passion for the traditional crafts and craftsmanship. In a time when technology has a lot to offer to the plate, a hunger for the traditional values creates an opportunity for a combination of technology and tradition. By working with the threads of old discarded jeans and anti-bacterial fibres for the production of the lace, a connection is made between the old and the new, and in this sense technology and tradition are merged into an innovative and tactile feel and style.
 

With an on-going interest for the coming together of the high-tech and the natural, Reduce brings with its made-by-hand aesthetics and different levels of techniques a very subtle entrance in Scandinavian couture and craftsmanship. We welcome the development of simple and yet voluminous couture pieces by a true talented artistic designer.

 

Sara Ingemann

 

www.bundgaard-nielsen.com

 

Sara Ingemann gives us on a regular basis, chosen fresh news from Scandinavia. Sara is a very sensitive person , in love with trends and style, she is also a talented writer and the brain behind  "Quote A Gentleman"

 

 

 

Mette Julie Bundgaard-Nielsen

design by Mette Julie Bundgaard-Nielsen

 

Mette Julie Bundgaard-Nielsen

design by Mette Julie Bundgaard-Nielsen


NØRDIC NEWS

nomad by Åke Axelsson

 

nomad by Åke Axelsson

Photos by Gustav Thörnqvist and Lennart Durehed

 

With simple wooden posts and traditionally bent frames, with rounded rods and canvas, without screws, nails or glue, Åke Axelsson, born in 1932, designer and co-owner of Gärsnäs, summarizes 60 years as a professional in his own furniture collection 'Nomad'.

 

Åke Axelsson’s furniture collection Nomad for the home is characterized by simplicity; everything from the construction and packaging to the distribution. The furniture is aimed at a design conscious, nomadic audience living in a small space, but is at the same time indicating the type of Swedish peasant traditional ideal that is close to the heart of Åke Axelsson. The collection is defined by traditional shapes, high functionality, great comfort, local production and longevity. "Nomad is a type of anti-design, where I have tried to push the simplicity to extremes. It is a highly personal collection, a kind of testament and the result of my 60 years as a designer and interior designer. I lack a statement in the design industry today, and feel that there is some sort of flashiness, partly instigated by the media. My collection is against all that." says Åke Axelsson. 

The growing ecological awareness in the furniture industry involves new challenges which correspond with the smallholder’s upbringing of Åke Axelsson in Småland, southeastern Sweden. In Nomad he has placed great emphasis on minimizing resources, as well as sustainability. The design is minimalistic, the shapes reduced to an absolute minimum, and production takes place with sensible use of materials with as little spillage as possible and  good storage, at the same time as Swedish craftsmanship and industrial knowledge are preserved. Nomad is designed with the aim of an internet based distribution with direct channels between customer and producer. The furniture comes disassembled and the customer puts them together without tools, glue or screws.

 

As Åke Axelsson explains it: "The collection has been created from the idea of being so simple that it can be made by a small workshop. The pieces are simple and easy to produce, rather labour-intensive than technology-intensive and made in smaller series. A wider audience should also find it easy to get hold of the furniture and the internet makes the collection available to all. I feel it is important to show that it is worth producing and selling furniture even in a smaller scale."

 

www.akeaxelsson.com

 

nomad by Åke Axelsson

Photo by Gustav Thörnqvist and Lennart Durehed

 

nomad by Åke Axelsson

Photo by Gustav Thörnqvist and Lennart Durehed

 

nomad by Åke Axelsson

Photos by Gustav Thörnqvist and Lennart Durehed

 


NØRDIC NEWS

the apartment

 

 

Sara Ingemann Holm-Nielsen gives us on a regular basis, chosen fresh news from Scandinavia. Sara is a very sensitive person , in love with trends and style, she is also a talented writer and the brain behind "Quote a Gentleman".

 

There is a special eclectic feeling and international rather than Nordic approach to The Apartment when entering the gallery, housed in a 18th century apartment in Christianshavn - the heart of Copenhagen. The concept and idea behind The Apartment is to create a space, where 20th century vintage furniture and contemporary art and design can be displayed in the inspiring settings of a private home.

 

When wandering from the entrée to the living room, guest chamber and further to the dining room, dressing room, kitchen and bathroom you get the vibe of being in a unique and iconic universe. The interior changes on a regular basis to enable the vision of a modern home. It’s clear that true craftsmanship and boldness of spirit are some of the keywords for the handpicked interior and contemporary art and design pieces.

 

The founder of The Apartment Tina Seidenfaden Busck is driven by strong aesthetics, quality and a story behind each design. Since the opening of the showroom in 2011 the founder has been implementing a bold mix of colours and eras with designs ranging from rare vintage pieces from the 1930’s–1960’s to selected objects by contemporary designers such as Michael Anastassiades, McCollin Bryan and Ilse Crawford.

Also to be found in The Apartment is a various selection of colourful aesthetics of Italian avant-garde design, Swedish 50’s designs, Moroccan Boucherouite rag rugs and hand painted wallpaper. Simply a strong mix that will inspire the visitor to embrace colours and textiles.

 

The smooth, monochrome and minimalistic Nordic look that has been prevalent through the 00’s, is seriously giving way to a warmer and more personal arty expression. The Apartment shows in an exclusive way that our home again will reflect its residents in the form of art, few but well picked objects with history and furniture made with the skill of hands. The vision behind The Apartment is also to find art and design pieces that will maintain and increase in value over time. If you don’t have the time to visit the unique private home in Copenhagen, Tina Seidenfaden Busck can be hired for personal consultations and the website just opened for international buyers. The new (inter)national is to be found by the small channels in Christianshavn, Copenhagen.

 

Sara Ingemann Holm-Nielsen

 
www.theapartment.dk

 

www.quoteagentleman.com

 

 

 

 

 


NØRDIC NEWS

the art of knitting

 Isabel Berglund

 

Sara Ingemann Holm-Nielsen gives us on a regular basis, chosen fresh news from Scandinavia. Sara is a very sensitive person , in love with trends and style, she is also a talented writer and the brain behind "Quote a Gentleman".

 

A home with a big green tree surrounded by white walls, a mint green “falling” person on a chair, a “closet knitter” and a “womanschair” are all objects made in yarn. The playful knit sculptures and installations relate to everyday objects by exploring the fine line between firm and fluid. By adding an unexpected twist to the work, the artist challenges the preconceptions of what constitutes the purpose of an object, also mirrored in the wordplay of the titles. On the one hand, the art pieces are tangible, because all viewers are familiar to the material wool and the art of knitting, but on the other hand, the objects are an image, a symbol, a comment to our perception of the reality we live in. A new reality focusing on the sense of playing and introducing the new human transition period being a kidult!

 

The art pieces are made by the Danish artist Isabel Berglund who skillfully knits her objects and installations. What starts off as an ordinary piece of knitting, takes on a new direction and transforms into unexpected forms, balancing between function and abstraction, hard and soft, the familiar and the unexpected. In the “Floating Pearls”, a knitted collage hangs from the ceiling and spreads out on the floor – as a piece of knitted garment, apparently left behind by coincidence. One feels as if the garment was worn by someone with the pearls around her neck. The person has now dissolved and, in color and all, become one with the very objects that fashioned her or his appearance: the pearls and the knit garment. While one still has an idea of the initial function of the object, it soon becomes obvious that a transformation is taking place, and that we are witnessing an object in the state of transition.

The overwhelming knitted proportions, the borderline between playfulness and the ordinary, the exploration of the unknown dimensions of knitted yarn objects all creates a new and contemporary take on the traditional skills of hands. The artist thereby transforms the life we live through a world of wool. With a childlike curiosity Isabel Berglund creates artwork where the visual sense-experience is essential and underneath the surface, more is at play.

 

Isabel Berglund’s knitted art installations made from one single yarn will spread as a spider web this coming year. The talented artist will display her art pieces at the Nordic House in the Faroe Islands in April 2013, at the “Wool Modern” exhibition at the Seoul Arts Center in Korea in October 2013, followed by an exhibition in Kobe, Japan and latest the exhibition Asia Europe II in the textile museum in Krefeld, Germany and Jean Lurcat & Tapestry Museum in France both in 2014.

 

Sara Ingemann Holm-Nielsen

 

www.isabelberglund.dk

 

 

www.quoteagentleman.com

 

ny falling  Isabel Berglund

 

 Isabel Berglund

 

 Isabel Berglund

 

Isabel Borglund hanging wood

 


NØRDIC NEWS

Sourdough Hotel

 

Bageriet_UrbanDeli

photo by Urban Orzolek

 

 

Sara Ingemann Holm-Nielsen gives us on a regular basis, chosen fresh news from Scandinavia. Sara is a very sensitive person , in love with trends and style, she is also a talented writer and the brain behind "Quote a Gentleman".

 

We can’t get enough of our breads in the Nordic countries. Rye bread, whole wheat, multi grain, crisp bread, gluten-free, organic, vegan, yeast-free etc. - a field that continue its growth. Even the traditional sourdough bread has felt the power of a trend from eco-lovers to locavores. There are sourdough blogs, sourdough bakeries and now the first ever sourdough hotel in Stockholm, Sweden. Despite the eco-friendliness and the healthy lifestyle choices there is also an invaluable social aspect of the spread of home-made bread. It gives an opportunity for homemade food lovers to create networks for passing on knowledge, sharing experiences and exchanging ideas.

 

The sourdough hotel, that’s part of Urban Deli in the hip Sofo district of Stockholm started almost 2 years ago and has been on everyone’s lips ever since. The whole new concept developed in collaboration with the local artist, Josefin Vargö, for her Living Culture project, and the bakery agreed on housing the collection of sourdough samples. The project became sort of an ‘intangible’ and immeasurable resource of sociological knowledge about how people around Sweden use sourdough. The most interesting findings regarding the project was; that there is something more about home-baked bread than people’s willingness for sustainable and healthy lifestyle.

Baking your own bread may be a metaphor for giving the best to those who we care about. In this sense, besides nourishing the body, home-made bread is also a key piece for people bonding with each other. Making, sharing and celebrating it can simply give a feeling of social belonging on every day basis.

What started out as an art project with jars of sourdough, is today part of Urban Deli’s bakery. The sourdough hotel is made for the Stockholmers who goes travelling and need their sourdough to be looked after – a nursery home to keep the sourdough thriving. The local bakers will look after the jars with sourdough and periodically add water and flour depending on the pre-ferment or to increase the volume of the starter. But the sourdough hotel also plays a more important role in the home bread-making culture. Sourdough baking is popular among the socially conscious and eco-worried opposing excessive food import. Other groups that find the concept deeply relevant are the stay-at-home-dads and young parents who are concerned with providing their offspring with commercially produced food. These groups have been a huge driving force in the Swedish sourdough trend.

 

The success of the sourdough hotel proves that the home production of bread or food in general might be more than a fad expected to pass quickly. It goes hand in hand with the local organic produced food, roof top gardening in the big cities, community gardens, co-operative society gardens, farm shops ect. At the moment the making of sourdough bread is the talk around the Nordic towns, and this momentum will definitely continue for the bread loving people of Scandinavia. Swedes will always be baking their crisp bread, Danes their rye bread, Norwegians their flatbread and so on. The taste, smell, feeling and touch of home-made bread is simply better than other breads and last longer.

 

Sara Ingemann Holm-Nielsen

 

www.urbandeli.org

 

www.quoteagentleman.com

 

 

photo by Urban Orzolek

photo by Urban Orzolek

 

Bageriet_UrbanDeli

photo by Urban Orzolek

 

photo by Urban Orzolek

photo by Urban Orzolek

 

photos by Urban Orzolek

photos by Urban Orzolek

 

photo by Urban Orzolek

photo by Urban Orzolek

 

Bageriet_UrbanDeli photo by Urban Orzolek

photo by Urban Orzolek


NØRDIC NEWS

touching nature

 

Untitled. Two projections. By Ayan Farah

Untitled. Two projections. By Ayan Farah

 

Sara Ingemann Holm-Nielsen gives us on a regular basis, chosen fresh news from Scandinavia. Sara is a very sensitive person , in love with trends and style, she is also a talented writer and the brain behind "Quote a Gentleman".

 

It is almost like a feeling – a touch of something we are about to destroy. The Somalia born, Stockholm raised and London graduated artist Ayan Farah obtains the physical and tactile records of natural phenomena as a part of her artistic practice. The artist travels to carefully selected locations scattered in the North European countries and bring the imprints of long-lasting nature processes into existence of her site-specific masterpieces.

 

In fact, the art pieces are influenced by natural phenomenon to such an extent that they become almost an integral part of the place of their conception. The trademark of her practice is to make use of unconventional technology and natural resources while creating sun-bleached canvases, UV-light processed paintings or solar photographs on silk and cotton. An almost sustainable artistic practice where the canvases and objects deliberately put in different locations become “stained” by the time.

 

As a result, wind, sunlight, rain and snow penetrate the material so immensely that their traces become fully integrated in the work. This reduces the physicality of the object and makes it part of the physical architectural space it occupies, and also connects it to the non-material lucidity of moving image and sound.

Farah execute in whatever medium is relevant for the specific piece varying from placed canvas on a house roof in Nuuk, Greenland to the lining of a sleeping bag dug down by the foot of the Eldfell volcano in Iceland. After several months the physical fabric has undergone a transformation and the result is mostly unpredictable and allow changes to happen. The state of the material shifts as the light changes throughout the day, revealing folds, layers, lucidity and opaqueness. In her own words this is how Farah explain her artistic practice. “It’s about how the work occupies space and co-exits with it, it’s about weight and weightlessness, the making or the unmaking of the work and its nature, it’s cause and creation.”

 

Characteristic about Farah’s work is the boarder of the deliberate and the provisional. It is form-full and at the same time formless, finished and unfinished, reflective, translucent, static but with an element that echoes time based media. There is a feeling of being inside and outside, on the other side and behind the side first expected. Sometimes humanity forget what is given by nature itself, but hopefully this talented artist will bring back a touch of a natural phenomena.

 

Sara Ingemann Holm-Nielsen

 

ayanfarah.com

 

quoteagentleman

 

 

Blushes of Aurora Installation by Ayan Farah

Blushes of Aurora Installation by Ayan Farah

 

North Facing Installation - Air Architecture Installation- by Ayan Farah

North Facing Installation - Air Architecture Installation- by Ayan Farah

 

Air Architecture - Sway - by Ayan Farah

Air Architecture - Sway - by Ayan Farah

 

North facing (8pm sunset)  - by Ayan Farah

North facing (8pm sunset) - by Ayan Farah

 

 


NØRDIC NEWS

light house on a common ground

 

Eldin Oscarsson photo by Magda di Siena

Eldin Oscarsson photo by Magda di Siena

 

 

Magda di Siena is an architect, an interior stylist and an art consultant. Her work is focused on projecting and setting exhibitions, fair stands, paper advertisements. She visited the Venice Architecture Biennale and shares with us the Nordic Pavilion.

 

One of the most interesting pavilions at the 13th Venice Architecture Biennale is undoubtedly the Nordic pavilion (representing Norway, Finland and Sweden), built in a 1962 design by Sverre Fehn, which celebrates its 50th birthday this year. To mark the occasion the curator, Peter MacKeith, has commissioned 32 architects, all born after 1962, to present their concepts of architecture as common ground.

 

In this pavilion, whose interior includes a number of trees integral to Fehn's design, the concept of an open dialogue with nature is already clearly expressed, and it seems that the new generations have taken the idea to heart.  After meetings, workshops and discussions between the participants, the structure of the exhibition was mapped out clearly and effectively: the decision was to exhibit, in the form of installations (the supports for which were designed by Professor Juhani Pallasma, a colleague and friend of Fehn), conceptual elements that would lead the visitor to an immediate reflection on perceptions of space, materials to be used in construction and attention to the surrounding landscape: considerations which were for too long labelled 'utopian', but are now  seen again as essential elements in any sustainable project of high aesthetic and functional quality.

 

Light house: on the Nordic common ground is the title chosen for the Scandinavian contribution to the Venetian exhibition. If architecture is once again a space for dialogue, what should it bring with it for this resumed journey? This is the question posed by the Biennale's curator, David Chipperfield.  The Scandinavian reply is the contents of Light house, which in a broad sense can also be taken as just (just?!) a collection of good ideas, good intentions, 'cells' from which new spatial and material conceptions can grow alongside a better constructional awareness.

 

The visitor's attention is seized at once by Adaptation, a work by the Haugen Zohar Arkitekter: a leveret covering its eyes with its forepaws in front of three pine cones painted white. Halfway between tragic and comic, this installation brings the observer face to face with an important question: is what we produce always pleasing or right for the user?

The territory we live in is, furthermore, shared with other species; they take part instinctively in a dialogue about building and we should pay attention to them before intervening on the territory. Another visually striking installation is the cube created by Marge Arkitekter out of rings cut from plastic bottles. This installation clearly defines the potentialities of materials designated as rubbish, which can and should be thought of as materials to be re-used in new processes with surprising new possibilities and new aesthetic qualities. Similar thoughts arise from the Hollmenn Reuter Sandman team's structure of irregular branches bent into the shape of a cube.

 

The imperfect has within it the potential to reveal new poetic forms, a tree can be transformed into something else without losing its identity. Likewise cardboard packaging can be transformed (by Verstas Architects) into an interesting model for the study of a living space. The idea of an architecture that refuses to impose itself forcefully, but almost camouflages itself in the territory of its insertion is well expressed by Tham & Videgards through a piece of stylised woodland in which a small house is placed almost as if it were its fruit. Manthey Kula also proposes a reflection on the re-utilisation of materials through a design for a seat created from scrap timber and a vertical element in grey felt, communicating a desire for non-formalisation, while managing to describe atmospheres and sensations even with poor materials.

 

Closing this short tour, we might look at the installation by TYIN tegnesteu: a tool-box containing a collection of thoughts and maxims for working well and feeling good in the company of others. Among other 'tools' is a dictionary of beautiful mistakes, including this quotation: ‘Don’t worry too much about language difficulties. Use the universal language of the drawing and be aware of your collaborators' body language’. A handy message to carry about in an ever more globalised world, where people of diverse languages and traditions are continually meeting on common ground.

 

Magda Di Siena

 

www.labiennale.org

 

Magda's web site

 

 

 

Marge Arkitecter photo by Magda di Viena

Marge Arkitecter photo by Magda di Viena

 

Left : detail of the pavilion - Right : Tham & Videgard - Photos by Magda di Viena

Left : detail of the pavilion - Right : Tham & Videgard - Photos by Magda di Viena

 

Manthey Kula photo by Magda di Siena

Manthey Kula photo by Magda di Siena

 

Left : Haugen Zohar Arkitekter - Right : Hollmen Reuter Sandman Architects _photos Magda di Siena

Left : Haugen Zohar Arkitekter - Right : Hollmen Reuter Sandman Architects _photos Magda di Siena

 

TYIN tegnestue photo Magda di Siena

TYIN tegnestue photo Magda di Siena

 

TYIN tegnestue photo Magda di Siena

TYIN tegnestue photo Magda di Siena

 

Verstas Architects photo Magda di Siena

Verstas Architects photo Magda di Siena

 


NØRDIC NEWS

country clash

 

Jensen & Skodvin Architects : Juvet Hotel- Norway- 2007 Photo Jensen & Skodvin Architects

Jensen & Skodvin Architects : Juvet Hotel- Norway- 2007 Photo Jensen & Skodvin Architects

 

The Nordic revolution is presented both in classic Scandinavian furniture design, Nordic craftsmanship, the world famous restaurant Noma, the local produced new Nordic Cuisine and also various architecture.  But is there a Nordic identity and does the Nordic way exist?

 

The Louisiana Museum of Modern Art is currently showcasing the exhibition New Nordic – Architecture & Identity, where some of these questions are in the spotlight. Despite the tendency of globalization where national and cultural differences are erased, it is important to notice if we still understand identity as something that is associated with particular places. If that is the case, how has the Nordic identity developed from the rest of the world?

 

The New Nordic exhibition explores how the five Nordic countries have experienced the latest development and how it’s taking form by asking what is the new Nordic and what is a rediscovery of the tradition? The Nordic is perhaps mainly evident in the clash between architects cultural roots and professional tradition on one hand, and on the other the fact that the global perspective is an inevitable condition for humanity today.

 

The exhibition focus on three main themes – reassessing the site-specific, reinteroritating community and reclaiming public space - areas where Nordic architecture has made its trademark in this first decade of the new millennium.Innovative buildings and original urban spaces shows the rebirth and interest of local and regional roots. But also welfare ideals are manifested in present day architecture – a welfare system that is often associated with the Nordic countries.

One of the great new tendencies within the Nordic societies is the Nordic sense of community. New institutions are build these years where many functions that used to be separate is now seen in new constructions. Hospitals become more-home-like atmosphere, library becomes concert halls and culture houses and citizens service centres are suddenly all in one.

 

The Nordic architecture is closely linked to landscapes and latitudes - from green beech forrest to ice-covered mountain caps, which is all closely associated with the quality sense amd choice of materials, proud building traditions and simplicity at its finest.  When today’s new Nordic wave both attract international attention and have impact on a globalized world, it is definitely in association with the Nordic values and visions.

 

New Nordic is both a rich narrative and a modern look on how we currently build in the Nordic region and express and organize ourselves and our community.

 

The exhibition continues until the 21st of October 2012.

 

Sara Ingemann Holm-Nielsen

 

 

www.louisiana.dk

 

Sara’s website

 

 

"New Nordic "

Left: photo L.Hirvilammi / Architects Louisiana Pavilion - Right: photo diephotodesigner.R.Ramstad Architects/National Tourist Route/Norway.

 

 

Snøhetta The Opreahouse / Oslo-Norway 2008-Photo Christopher Hagelundbirdseyepix.

Snøhetta The Opreahouse / Oslo-Norway 2008-Photo Christopher Hagelundbirdseyepix.


NØRDIC NEWS

a fresh design

 

photo courtesy of muuto

photo courtesy of muuto

 

We are happy to introduce you to Sara Ingemann Holm-Nielsen who will give us on a regular base, chosen frech news from Scandinavia. Sara is a very sensitive person , in love with trends and style, she is also a talented writer and the brain behind "Quote a Gentleman".

 

Scandinavian furniture design is known for its golden era in the 1950s and 1960s, characterized by simplicity, minimalism, functionality and democratic in the sense that everyday objects should be affordable for not only the wealthy, but for all.

 

The democratic Scandinavian design ideals have survived and a new movement is positioned with the creative Nordic platform Muuto. The name Muuto is inspired by the Finnish word “muutos”, which means change or new perspective. The name itself is a new wave of Scandinavian design success where the best handpicked design talents and leading contemporary designers from Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Finland are given the freedom to express their individual story through everyday objects.

 

This new movement and chapter to the Scandinavian design tradition begin with the Muuto New Nordic collection consisting of furniture, lightning and accessories. The collection vary from the Wood Lamp by the Stockholm based design studio TAF Architects, that provides a low-tech counterweight desk lamp with a iconic and modern expression to the Raw Side Table by the Swedish designer Jens Fager.

The Raw collection consisting of handmade table, chair and candlestick is based on rough and intuitive interpretations of iconic everyday objects with a modern Nordic colour palette.

The Crushed Bowl by the Copenhagen based JDS Architects manifests big-scale architecture to small-scale objects. The geometric principals are still very strong, but the pure lines of the classics have now been combined with something more fluid. Another everyday object that captures the New Nordic wave is Under the Bell lamp by the Iskos-Berlin. The recyclable plastic, which the lamp is made of, absorbs sound and improves the acoustics in the room. It almost creates a space within the space. Last but not least the Visu chair by the Finnish designer Mika Tolvanen combines the old Scandinavian furniture traditions with a fresh feeling of lightness and modernity.

 

A hallmark of Scandinavian design is the respect for simple materials such as wood, steel, canvas, glass and cork combined with the Nordic natural light, traditional craftsmanship, classic lines and forms from the Scandinavian furniture masters from the 1950s and 1960s.

 

Sara' s web site 

 

www.muuto.com 

 

 

photo courtesy of muuto

photo courtesy of muuto

 

photo courtesy of muuto

photo courtesy of muuto

 

photo courtesy of muuto

photo courtesy of muuto

 

photo courtesy of muuto

photo courtesy of muuto