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the revolutionary roast

credit Chinatown cafe

 

Washington D.C.’s independent coffee shop community is brewing dissidence. And it’s rather delicious.
 
In an effort to reign in the corporate reach of America and educate fellow coffee connoisseurs, a group of six independent coffee shops in Washington DC have banded together and established The Disloyalty Program. Get The D.C. Disloyal card punched at six independent coffee shops across the city and get a free cup at the end – from whichever establishment you choose. A great way to try new brews, learn about new beans and meet awesome coffee professionals, the Disloyal Program makes the most of a free market economy.
 
DC Disloyal Founder (and Peregrin Espresso barista) Dawn Shanks says, “I hope the card is a fun way for DC coffee lovers to sort of explore different shops and engage with the people making coffee.”
 
As conscious consumerism continues to make serious waves in the United States, more and more people are re-discovering the importance and power of independent artisans and local maker communities. Programs like Disloyal are redrafting our everyday loyalties and redefining the quality of consumer goods. Join me in bidding adieu to stale coffee, faceless corporations and poor labor practices.

Participating coffee shops include: The Blind Dog, The Coffee Bar, Peregrin Espresso, Chinatown Coffee Co, Filter and La Mano.
 
Beth Lauck
 
dcdisloyal.tumblr.com

 

Beth Lauck contributes posts about emerging and disruptive design and communications trends, and helps forecast why and how these changes will affect market intelligence. She also maintains a blog devoted to the intersections between fashion, future studies and trend science. She completed an internship with Trend Union in 2012 as the Assistant Editor and Community Manager of Trend Tablet, and considers her experiences with the Trend Union team an invaluable addition to her work as a trend forecaster and fashion theorist. 
 
www.what-nxt.com

 

credit Chinatown cafe

 

credit Chinatown cafe

 

 

the Coffee Bar left - Blind Dog Cafe Credit to Armando Gallardo right

 

The Coffee Bar


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new skins

photo christrini

 

Beth Lauck contributes bi-monthly posts about emerging and disruptive design and communications trends, and helps forecast why and how these changes will affect market intelligence. She also maintains a blog devoted to the intersections between fashion, future studies and trend science. She completed an internship with Trend Union in 2012 as the Assistant Editor and Community Manager of Trend Tablet, and considers her experiences with the Trend Union team an invaluable addition to her work as a trend forecaster and fashion theorist. 

 

As the world of 3D printing evolves, Francis Bitoni Studios is staying ahead of innovation's steep curve. Bitoni Studios has pioneered a three-week intensive interdisciplinary research called, New Skins, where students and professionals in the fashion, art, architecture and computing industries join forces to design and fabricate second skins for the body. Students are immersed in complex 3D modeling, and generate a wide range of geometric formations ranging from organic bone-like structures to articulated chainmail meshes. The project captures the human body via 3D scanning technology, and with the help of robotics and sensing technology, creates smart transformable garments that are as much art as they are an exercise in mechanics and human anatomy.

The Verlan Dress, shown below, was created using 3D anatomical models of the human body from the inside out. Hidden lines and vectors of the human body – muscles, veins, and arteries – were transformed into curves that could be manipulated in a 3D modeling environment. The entire design was printed on two MakerBots using MakerBot's new Flexible Filament material which allowed the designers to produce a flexible, 3D-printed garment that is able to conform to the body's movement when worn.

 

Watch the video below for an inside look at the future of 3D printing technology.

 

Beth Lauck

 

www.newskins2013.com

 

francisbitonti.com

 

Beth's blog

 

photo christrini

photo christrini

photo christrini

photo christrini

 

 


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zady: fashion's clear conscience

 

Zady Brand Collage

 

 

Beth Lauck contributes bi-monthly posts about emerging and disruptive design and communications trends, and helps forecast why and how these changes will affect market intelligence. She also maintains a blog devoted to the intersections between fashion, future studies and trend science. She completed an internship with Trend Union in 2012 as the Assistant Editor and Community Manager of Trend Tablet, and considers her experiences with the Trend Union team an invaluable addition to her work as a trend forecaster and fashion theorist. 

 

On August 27th, fashion gets a clear conscience. E-commerce site, Zady is opening its doors to the public and grabbing the helm of conscious consumerism. Zady is a shopping and lifestyle destination for consumers who care about the origins of of the items they purchase. Without sacrificing style or taste,  Zady upholds an unprecedented commitment to manufacturing transparency: each product featured on the site has been personally vetted by Zady's founders, using criteria for sustainability, including whether the product is locally-sourced, handmade, uses high-quality raw materials, is environmentally conscious, or made in the U.S.A. Founded by Soraya Darabi (Foodspotting; The New York Times), and Maxine Bédat (The Bootstrap Project), Zady offers craftsmanship with a clear conscience – from start to finish. Brands include Nashville-based denim designers, Imogene + Willie; Madrid, Spain's innovative recycled material-friendly Ecoalf; and pea coat manufacturer Gerald & Stewart.

 

We scored an interview with Soraya and Maxine. Scroll down for an inside look into how the company came into being, plans for a brick-and-mortar store, and what trends to expect next.

 

Where did the idea for Zady.com come from?

We met in high school in Minneapolis, Minnesota. We became friends back then, and bonded because we both have international parents.  Maxine’s parents are from South Africa; Soraya’s father is from Iran. After high school, Maxine moved to New York and Soraya to Washington, D.C. for college. Maxine graduated from Barnard College in New York City and Soraya from Georgetown University in D.C.

 

Years after college ended, while I (Maxine) was in Law School at Columbia and Soraya was living in New York, working for a startup, we reconnected over Facebook. Having read articles about each other, we were both interested in what the other was doing professionally. I (Maxine) was working on the non-profit I founded called The Bootstrap Project which helps revive craft traditions in the developing world and finishing law school.  Soraya was advising startups based in New York City. I came across the Fast Company Magazine issue with Soraya on the cover in the airport, during a 2010 trip for The Bootstrap Project.  Soraya read an article on Bootstrap’s beautiful artisanal crafts in a House and Home Magazine.

 

After the first coffee, Soraya asked me if I needed help with the digital strategy for TBP and of course I was happy to have the help.  Over the next few months, we both realized a few things:

We liked one another still! We had complementary skills. We both shared a growing interest in understanding how supply chain works and how beautiful things are made.

 

As we shared articles back-and-forth about the negative impact of fast fashion, we sent one another recommendations for newly discovered products with origins we could actually trace. From this the idea of Zady was born – a company that searches the globe for- and with- the consumer to curate a selection of products that are both beautiful and ethically produced.

 

The connection with The Bootstrap Project as a source of craft revival and economic development was important, so we decided that 5% of proceeds from every Zady sale would go to The Bootstrap Project to help artisans in the developing world continue to create beautiful craft and preserve their important cultural tradition.

 

In some sense, Zady.com is necessitating a paradigmatic shift from a culture of convenience to a culture of sustainability. How will stores like H&M and Forever 21 – pioneers of fast fashion – fit into this new model?

It’s interesting. In the early 1960s, 95% of the clothing Americans wore were American-made. Today, however, the U.S. imports more than 95% of its apparel and 99% of its shoes from other nations.  A substantial amount of imported goods are delivered to fast fashion chains, and to the major distribution chains.   So over the last generation, we saw a paradigm shift to the culture of convenience you describe, which is also part of our culture of consumption.

 

H&M currently buys 400 million garments a year.  And it’s not unusual for a nationwide chain to contract production for up to 100,000 garments in one style.

 

Zady will be part of the movement of change, to reach consumers craving an era where products were made beautifully, with an emphasis on craft and style.  It’s all part of the zeitgeist, and we want to be a helpful part of it - for people who already know the origins of the food they eat, they exercise regularly to feel good and healthy, and now they’d like to feel equally healthy about the products they place on their bodies.

As more and more people gravitate to conscious consumption, the fast fashion pioneers will have to change or risk getting left behind. Much in the same way that Walmart, the apex of all things mass, now includes organic food choices (something that would have been unthinkable a decade ago) fast fashion will have to fundamentally change their structure to convince customers that their clothing is both ethically produced and can stand the test of time.

 

Zady.com's commitment to manufacturing transparency is almost unprecedented in the fashion industry. How else do you hope to change the landscape of fashion in years to come?

Zady will bring prosperity and give a voice to great brands that value quality of material and production – both large and small.  We particularly want to help our community discover those special products that they would not otherwise be able to find. We want to help preserve techniques in manufacturing products that may have been lost overtime in the fashion industry.  We want to use modern digital tools to tell stories that deserve to be told.

 

Fast Fashion has made billions of dollars selling the idea that by pushing poorly made product on the cheap, they are “democratizing fashion.” But what they have really done is pushed people to believe that in order to be stylish, they have to buy clothing every week. And it doesn’t matter that it won’t last because they can just throw it out. Our hope is to turn fast fashion on its head. It’s a huge challenge, of course, but the buying public is ready. We’re tired of closets full of sub-standard.

 

Do you have plans for personalizing search results for returning customers?

Yes. The first iteration of Zady.com will launch on August 27. Over time, we have plans for dramatic personalization and customized features for our audience.  We intend to enhance our geo-located map of the world, for instance, to default to the city or town our customers happen to be in at their moment of search. Eventually, we will show customers items their friends liked on Zady.  It’s all in due time.  At the moment, we are discovering the possibilities of the social-web and creating communities for @zady on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram - asking our community what features they would like to see on Zady will be key to creating our project pipelines of the future.

 

Zady.com addresses a new generation of conscious consumers; people empowered by the collective intelligence of their social networks and resources. What other lifestyle features and stories can we expect from Zady.com ?

 

One of the most profound aspects of Zady that we know will connect with our customers is the storytelling for each brand. This will involve interviews with each brand owner and creator so that our customers can develop a deeper relationship with the products when they shop on Zady. There will also be features that may tie directly or indirectly to a product on Zady. For instance, a denim brand will be accompanied by an original article that illustrates the history of denim manufacturing in the US.

 

So Zady will not only be a destination to purchase products, but also serve as a resource for the reader and shopper who wants to learn more  - a lot more - about the products they buy.

 

We have a section on our website called “Origins” which begins as a dynamic map of the world, highlighting products on different spots of the map.  Those product icons represent products ZADY sells.  If you click on a product, information then appears on the map, detailing where the brand that sells the product is headquartered, where the raw materials that comprise that product come from, where the product was designed and manufactured.  It’s data we collect and input into our own database, because we feel it is so important to detail and share.

 

As we hear from our community we want to report back on topics that interest them. The lens of timeless style can be applied in many assets of our life. Profiles of people with interesting careers, unique and inspiring travel destinations, investigative pieces on the fashion industry, and those pieces that strike a chord with where we are culturally, these are all the kinds of subjects we are excited to cover going forward.

 

Do you have any plans to grow a brick-and-mortar presence for Zady.com, or will you operate exclusively via e-commerce?

We are really focused on making the Zady.com experience compelling, exciting and seamless. Once Zady.com is launched and fully established, our goal will be to open a brick-and-mortar presence with all of the Zady products curated in one place.  We are working to have something smaller scale in place for the holidays this year.  Further down the road, we will launch a line of Zady-branded products…  but we are focusing on one step at a time.

 

What fashion and lifestyle trends do you see on the horizon in 2014?

We think stylish, sustainable clothing is going to be a huge trend in 2014.   It just feels like the moment has arrived, and trend and forecasting data only seem to back up our intuition. We think Americans buy roughly twenty billion garments per year. Given the recession, given our nation’s growing interest in understanding how and where their products were made, we think the timing is right to launch Zady.

Beth Lauck

 

 ZADY

 

Beth's blog

 

 

Soraya & Maxime- Zady.com -

Soraya & Maxime- Zady.com -

 

imogene+willie

imogene+willie


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unwoven light

 

Soo Sunny Park - Photo by Nash Baker

Soo Sunny Park - Photo by Nash Baker

Beth Lauck contributes bi-monthly posts about emerging and disruptive design and communications trends, and helps forecast why and how these changes will affect market intelligence. She also maintains a blog devoted to the intersections between fashion, future studies and trend science. She completed an internship with Trend Union in 2012 as the Assistant Editor and Community Manager of Trend Tablet, and considers her experiences with the Trend Union team an invaluable addition to her work as a trend forecaster and fashion theorist. 

 

Currently on view at Rice Gallery in Houston, Texas is Soo Sunny Park's latest installation, Unwoven Light. Rice Gallery has been transformed into a shimmering world of light, shadow, and brilliant color. Suspended from the walls and ceiling, thirty-seven individually sculpted units are arranged as a graceful, twisting flow of abstract form.

 

Unwoven Light continues Park's ongoing experimentation with the ephemeral qualities of light and how light shapes our perceptions of architectural space. Though immaterial, light is a critical structural element in each of Park's works. Here, she has utilized both the gallery's lighting and the natural light that enters through the front glass wall. Park notes, “We don’t notice light when looking so much as we notice the things light allows us to see. Unwoven Light captures light and causes it to reveal itself, through colorful reflections and refractions on the installations surfaces and on the gallery floor and walls.”

Park employs the grid-like structure of chain link fencing to "unweave" strands of natural and artificial light. Wired into each open cell of the chain link is a cut-out shape of iridescent Plexiglas. Park explains, “Like a net, the sculpture is a filter that is meant to capture the light that is already there and force it to reveal itself. Now we can see it, the light, in purple shadows and yellow-green reflections that both mirror the shape of the fence and restructure the space they inhabit.”

 

Each visitor's experience of Unwoven Light will be unique, depending upon the time of day, ratio of natural to artificial light, precise angle of viewing, and even the number of people in the gallery.

 

Beth Lauck

 

soosunnypark.com

 

 

www.ricegallery.org

 

 

Beth's blog

 

 

Soo Sunny Park - Photo by Nash Baker

Soo Sunny Park - Photo by Nash Baker

 

Soo Sunny Park - Photo by Nash Baker

Soo Sunny Park - Photo by Nash Baker

 

Soo Sunny Park - Photo by Nash Baker

Soo Sunny Park - Photo by Nash Baker


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Gaga for Ghurka

 

 

 Ghurka

by Ghurka

 

Beth Lauck contributes bi-monthly posts about emerging and disruptive design and communications trends, and helps forecast why and how these changes will affect market intelligence. She also maintains a blog devoted to the intersections between fashion, future studies and trend science. She completed an internship with Trend Union in 2012 as the Assistant Editor and Community Manager of Trend Tablet, and considers her experiences with the Trend Union team an invaluable addition to her work as a trend forecaster and fashion theorist. 

 

 

The Ghurka story begins in 1970 at an antiquities market in the U.K. Fueled by a love of history and leather craft, company found Marley Hodgson bid on campaign gear made for a Ghurka regimental officer of the British Army stationed in India during the early 1900s. Hodgson lost the auction, but he acquired the special tanning formula that accounts for the renowned durability and suppleness of Ghurka leather.

The name Gurkha is derived form the Hindu warrior-saint Guru Gorakhnath, and represents an indigenous people from mid-western and eastern Nepal.

 

Ghurka leather bags and accessories are handmade by master artisans committed to a tradition of superior craftsmanship, superb functionality and timeless American style. Everything that bears the Ghurka mark is designed and built to provide a lifetime of use and enjoyment. Featured in both The New Yorker and Wallpaper Magazine, Ghurka leather honors and elevates the sacred history of the warrior-saint and offers a unique response to the fast fashion culture of today's economy.

 

www.ghurka.com



Beth's blog 

 

 

 

 

Sean Sullivan for Ghurka

photo by Sean Sullivan for Ghurka


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arrested by art

Valerie Hegarty at the BMA

Valerie Hegarty at the BMA

 

Many of us stand there looking at this piece by Valerie Hegarty at the Brooklyn Museum of Art, trying to understand what effect it truly has on us. Bent, scorched, melting, these shrapnels of a landscape and bits of ravage witness one more disaster to overcome. Stunning!

 

Emmanuelle Linard

 

www.brooklynmuseum.org

 

 


US TAB

les sofas un peu bêtes du art institute of chicago

 

 

Grecian Couch 1825/40 New Yok or New England - photo by emmanuelle linard

Grecian Couch 1825/40 New Yok or New England - photo by emmanuelle linard

 

There is something moving in the way these sofas are displayed in the American furniture section of the formidable Art Institute of Chicago. Antique pieces from the East Coast, crafted somewhere from 1825 through 1870 in New York or maybe New England it is unclear, all sitting low under a rather odd selection of paintings and portraits hung too close to them.

 

For one, the Grecian couch with ultra symmetrical woven dots from the 1830s invites the two overlooking portraits, an endearing gentlewoman and a romantic dandy in matching colors, to roll up the conversation onto the wavy shapes below. A not so conventional sectional.

 

Then there is the chubby pink 1860s sofa with a triptych backseat, ornate with cameos of Her and of Him at its tips, which claims to be made of rosewood and ... ormolu. Ormolu? Sounds like the name of some fancy bird that could drop any minute straight from the William Bradford marine "The Coast of Labrador"  onto the arms of the couch. But no, ormolu is an old English translation from French "or moulu", or ground gold, an 18th century term describing the application of gold powder as a finish on wood, precious enough like a cocotte...

And finally there is this 1855 complicated laminated rosewood, ash and cherry piece, freshly re-upholstered in a flashy green and white floral damask.

It is flanked on top by the 1881 "Study for an Aragonese Smuggler" painting by William Turner Dannat, chiaroscuro rendering of a man in shabby clothes with raised arms throwing his head back and pouring water in his open mouth.The painting is as tormented as the couch is still, as patine-d as the couch is plastic, as low-life as the couch is high life. One volunteers for humble and the other screeches pretense.One tells a story of realistically neo-poor and the other of ostentatiously nouveau-riche. How can two objects be more aesthetically opposed to each other. Yet somehow the odd tandem works, kind of creating an occupy wall street design moment. Or like an old rich lady and her much younger artistic lover, sofa and painting make strange but interesting bed fellows.

 

This inspires us to spark again at the visit of the forgotten furniture aisles of musea, those long shielded from the scrutinizing eyes of curators. These aisles subsist all over the world indeed, in major art establishments as well as in regional museums. Oscar Wilde himself, in his desire to educate North Americans to a House more Beautiful, would have liked the incongruous associations, I'm sure. I appreciate the naïveté and the randomness maybe of the display. A non-curated anthropological manifesto.

 

Emmanuelle Linard

 

Sofa, 1855:65, New York - Sofa, 1860/ 70, New York, rosewood & ormolu - photo by emmanuelle linard

Sofa 1855/65 New York - Sofa 1860/70, New York rosewood & amp ormolu - photos emmanuelle linard

 


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the nomadic farming project

 

 

photos by emmanuelle linard

photos by emmanuelle linard

 

The Textile Art Center located in Park Slope, Brooklyn, provide support for fiber and weaving professionals as well as people interested in the fiber professions, by acting as a resource facility and a creative meeting place.

 

The center hosts an artist in residence program where students rent a workshop for 6 months, and it holds classes in textile related disciplines such as weaving, embroidery, or natural dye processes.The TAC runs a natural garden in neighboring lot, using the dye plants in classes and providing shares to their CSA members, also using the space for workshops and lectures.

Adjacent to the TAC’ s natural dye garden is the Nomadic Farming Project  ran by Feedback Farms.Vegetables are planted and grown in large burlap bags sitting on wooden pallets, to be lifted, loaded and transported to other locations as they ripen and ready for harvest, to leave space for new planted seeds, or move indoors for the winter season, insuring a rotation for movable planters and optimizes production. Like camping for plants.

 

Emmanuelle Linard

 

feedbackfarms.com

 

textileartscenter.com

 

 

photo by emmanuelle linard

photos by emmanuelle linard

 

photo by emmanuelle linard

photo by emmanuelle linard


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Trip to Aspen, Colorado

 

photo by emmanuelle linard

photo by emmanuelle linard

 

Aspen, Colorado, is an interesting little town. Remote from large hubs yet nestled in the heart of the United States, it hosts a tight-knitted community of 5,000 committed people, which grows to 30,000 during the ski season. The scenery is terrific; you can enjoy the views by riding up with the gondolas to a peak perched at a 12,000 ft altitude.

Aspen’s history is one of cultural heritage; it was founded around 1888 by Jerome B Wheeler, an industrial and financier who brought his wife Harriet Macy, heir to the Macy’s department store, to Colorado, in search of a place with pure air to help cure her respiratory problems.

(I can witness indeed that the air in Aspen is quite pure, at such oxygen-deprived altitude, breathing while exercising is surprisingly smooth.)

Jerome Wheeler started mining for silver and made a flash-fortune in 4 years during which he built cultural establishments and structures for larger crowds that would welcome the intelligentsia of the East Coast as well as thinkers, politicians, business people and artists from Europe.

The hotel Jerome is a witness to this glorious past, being at the heart of Aspen by its central location but also by its noble construction: large of 90 rooms and still decorated in the turn of the 20th century style, it displays a charming obsolete European grandeur while offering the warmth of cosy winter lounges, majestuous hallways, bars and a 4,000 sqft ballroom.

Ever since that time, and even after crossing three major depressions that brought the town to its knees to total poverty, a tradition of culture and international flair persists. Aspen gathers thousands of people for world class events, the famous Food and Wine Classic event being one of them. I was attending recently there the three day Global Wellness Summit, an American venture founded in 2006 reuniting each year a growing community of spa executives worldwide, while the green energy summit was also happening at the hotel Jerome. Famous people spoke at both events, amongst them the governor of Colorado, former Davos CEO Philippe Bourguignon, or Jose Maria Figueres Olsen, president of Coast Rica from 1994-1998, now president of The Carbon War Room and an engaged activist for sustainable industry practices. Inspiring people.

What struck me during the three day- spa conference is that most speakers brought health to the center stage of the discussion; I believe that wellness establishments will become the clinics of the future, where prevention and rewards for patients in good health will prevail, in reaction to a system that has become more of a sickcare system than a healthcare one, where diseases are engines fueling chemical cures from pharmaceutical giants, for patients marketed as products.

The obesity debate also took center stage. A heavy  topic in social media as well, especially in America, where ¼ of the population is overweight, where a plane passenger recently was un-boarded for being too big for one seat, where a chain food burger costs $.99 and a salad $4.99.

The group of spa students who won the prize at the Global wellness Summit student competition this year is from California: four cheeky girls who imagined the concept of a spa for VIGs, Very Important Girls, targeting girlfriends and sisters in a  12-18 age bracket, who gather to relax, interact and receive beauty treatments in a man-free environment. A man-free environment! Wow, young girls are empowered beyond feminism these days. Interesting trend to notice next to the new father trend that Li recently mentioned in the Trendtablet newsletter: the masculine is in need of a make-over.

 

Aspen is an inspiring place; I will go back during ski season, to see how it feels to exercise in the snowy pure air while getting stimulated by cultural events…

 

Emmanuelle Linard

 

www.globalspaandwellnesssummit.org

 

www.aspeninstitute.org

 

 

photo by emmanuelle linard

photo by emmanuelle linard

 

photo by emmanuelle linard

photo by emmanuelle linard

 

photo by emmanuelle linard

photo by emmanuelle linard

 

 


US TAB

fashion designers without borders

Garment Graffiti by Thomas Voorn

Garment Graffiti by Thomas Voorn

 

 

Chrissie Lam, a senior concept designer at US retail brand American Eagle Outfitters for twelve years, always wanted to connect her passion for fashion, adventure and philanthropy.

After taking a sabbatical from her design position to go to Rwanda and explore clothing craftsmanship, she decided to launch The Supply Change, a network whose purpose is to alleviate extreme poverty by connecting artisans in emerging economies with the global market place.

 

Chrissie explains: “We are curating experiences and enlisting like-minded design colleagues in order to help them realize the potential of sourcing in developing countries. I believe change comes from within a company, and currently there is a disconnect between people in the design industry and social enterprises/artisan groups abroad. If design professionals can connect with great organizations, meet the artisans, witness the social impact and be inspired by the local resources, they are more likely to return to their companies with enthusiasm and the knowledge to advocate for a brand-social enterprise collaboration. We want to create ambassadors – ambassadors that can influence change within their companies and raise awareness and action through real stories and word-of-mouth experiences.”

The venture, she ads, is not a non-profit, for it is meant to bring resources to those involved.

The Supply Change has partnered with travel agency Extraordinary Journeys to create unique travel programs under the name of Fashion Designers Without Borders. The first program will be held in Kenya on February 16-23, 2013 and will educate and connect participants with artisan social enterprises hat work with brands like Edun, Suno, Puma, Max Mara, Whole Foods and others.  A second trip will be organized in March 2013 in Guatemala.

 

Even though only a few weeks old, The Supply Change is receiving great press and support from medias. The public is ready; now the corporate world is definitely in need for change, not only the merchandise but the job positions themselves have become so boring that business as usual can no longer be sustained.

Thanks to the relevance in timing of this start-up, and through the passion of its founder, this venture will go a long way; Edelkoort Inc is happy to support. Good luck!

 

Emmanuelle Linard

 

http://thesupplychange.org/

 

www.fashiondesignerswithoutborders.com

 

 


US TAB

mortal stillness

 

 

Moss Bureau

photo by emmanuelle linard

 

The highlight of New York Design Week for me was Murray Moss’s installation Midway & Mortal Stillness.

 

The Moss company left the high traffic Soho space to move into the ailing but still bustling Fashion District, on 36th Street between 7th and 8th Avenue.

 

The elected building is a new development that resembles a turn of the 19th century construction. In the elevator taking you to the 10th floor, the Moss team posted a warning that the installation contains strobes. Indeed: once you enter the new Moss space, re-baptized “Moss Bureau”, you find yourself immersed in an office/showroom environment where lined-up computer desktops pair with the unique vintage office chairs of the business hours personnel and play each a video of the current exhibition; the copy machine stands as a background to Maarteen Baas Grandfather Clock, the sprinkler system painted in red runs from window to window, overlooking in the back the coating manufacturing facilities in the neighbor building, all office features are juxtaposed to the strikingly beautiful “Midway” installation featuring Cathy McLure pieces.

This installation is described as a zoetropic “circus”; mechanical bronze-colored toys stripped off their fur spin on their carousel, rendered alive by stroboscopic flashes entrained by the ritournelle of a mechanical organ soundtrack. A sweet feeling of unease seizes you as you watch the carousel turn: it echoes the state of a grinding world in economic decadence that keeps turning mechanically as if waiting for its batteries to go out, in denial of its own decline.

 

Realistic, threatening and beautiful, a true impersonation of romanticism.

Also featured are Julia Kunin’s porcelan bronzed colored vessels.

 

The Moss team is making the most out of a space considerably smaller than the previous one, in blending office features and design, “bringing the back stage in the front stage”, as Franklin Getchell explains, and as Murray points, “daily computers dress up at night and become part of the fancy show”.

 

Necessity as the mother of invention, so true, thank you Murray.

By Emmanuelle Linard

 

www.mossonline.com

 

 

 

 

Moss Bureau

photo by emmanuelle linard


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union square market

 

photo by emmanuelle linard

photo by emmanuelle linard

The Union Square Farmer's Market in the heart of New York City is still going strong. Every Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, neighboring farmers, fishers and producers from upstate New York, Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania or even Vermont offer their products to the Manhattan crowd.

 

Besides the cornucopia of pesticide-free vegetables, roots, fruits, flowers and small trees fit for city life, meat-related products abound: a Catskill Merino Sheep farm offers lamb's legs as well as sheepskin and color-died skeins; an ostrich and emu farm sells giant eggs full or empty and diverse part of 97% fat-free red ostrich meat; a ranch from Pennsylvania offers angus & bison meat from grass-fed animals raised without antibiotics, hormones or steroids.

 

Various recycling programs are offered, such as clothing under the label Wearable Collections or the plastic bag recycling program for those who pledge to bring their own reusable plastic bag to shop at the market to help reduce plastic usage through the city.

The Community Compost program from the Lower East Side Ecology Center sells composting systems and  gather kitchen scraps from households in large garbage cans to compost, repackage and and re-sell as fertile soil once processed. Lavender, local beer and maple candy from Vermont are also available.

 

More expensive than smaller markets around the five boroughs or Philadelphia, but very eco-friendly for us city locals, still...what a blessing to live nearby...

By Emmanuelle Linard.

 

 

www.wearablecollections.org

 

www.lesecologycenter.org

 

www.unionsquaregreenmarket

 

photo by emmanuelle linard

photo by emmanuelle linard

 

 

photo by emmanuelle linard

photo by emmanuelle linard

 

photos by emmanuelle linard

photos by emmanuelle linard

 

photo by emmanuelle linard

photo by emmanuelle linard

 


US TAB

the two faces of hemp

 

Marijuna in Paro Bhutan

Purple haze. In the US, sixteen states and Washington, DC,  have legalized medical marijuana, and 16 other states have pending legislation.  This means that pot is one thing that some Republican states like Mississippi or Nebraska and some Democrat states like Maine and Connecticut can agree on, uniting divided America in a purple haze of red and blue…

Much farming takes place in sunny California, with a value of pot crops estimated at $14 billion, and growing competition also: the police discovered last summer North of San Francisco 121 pot farms, up from 37 the year before, most of them illegal.

Since unemployment is high, more and more white former private school students choose to work as pot farmers, trimming the plants, chopping them down and letting them cure in heated warehouses for three to four weeks, after which more temporary workers are imported to cut the dried leaves and prepare them for the market. A growing state matter!

 

more to read on GOOD 

Building with hemp. Industrial hemp comes from Cannabis Sativa, the same plant species that produces marijuana, and therefore the production of industrial hemp has been long prohibited in the United States. Even in Santa Barbara, California, a state where medical marijuana is legalized, the authorities haven’t yet decided whether to allow the building with hemp to proceed.

Hempcrete is a mixture of hemp, lime and water, a very sustainable material that is energy-efficient, non-toxic, resistant to mold, insects and fire. It also absorbs carbon dioxide, purifying the air from city pollution inside the structure.

“NauHaus”, a North-Carolina project  by Hemp Technologies, has homes built in Hawaii, Texas, North-Carolina and Idaho, and has received the LEED platinum status.

 

By Emmanuelle Linard

 

www.hemp-technologies.com

 


US TAB

we moved!

photo emmanuelle linard

photo emmanuelle linard

Dear Tablet friends,

 

We are happy to announce that we moved our Edelkoort Inc New York quarters to the Abbey near Union Square, the belly button of Manhattan! A fresh start in a fantastic central location.

 

From our window we look at nature with Stuyvesant Park, at the future with friend’s school, and up for inspiration with the St. George church.

It’s all about the view. We are happy to welcome you in our sunny office.

 

Soon,

 

Lidewij, Emmanuelle and the Edelkoort Group

 

 

www.edelkoortinc.com

 

 

 

photo by emmanuelle linard

photo by emmanuelle linard

 

photo by emmanuelle linard

photo by emmanuelle linard