MILAN THE SALONE

master edit by erica & faye toogood #milan2014

 

Photos courtesy of Studio Toogood

Photos courtesy of Studio Toogood

 

Celebrating fashion derived from hard industry rather than the fashion industry itself, Erica and Faye Toogood’s Master Edit collection reinterprets emblematic garments worn by honest tradesman through a rich plethora of material experimentation and shape exploration.
 
Weeding through the jungle that was Salone del Mobile, Fourisalone and an ever-growing attention to interdisciplinary models, Studio Toogood showcased it’s dynamic approach through furniture, ceramics and couture. As always, the maverick London-based practice's concept-based designs pushed the limits of tactility, form and craft – ultimately communicating a well-rounded story with strong validation on all levels.
 
Next to Studio Toogood’s recently debuted Roly Poly Assemblage #4 furniture series – monumental fiberglass-cast daybeds, tables and chairs, extrapolated by a focal point geometric compilation weaving – Erica and Faye Toogood revealed their Master Edit coat collection. The beige to black gamut was displayed on a equally industry-inspired scenography.
 
Beyond glamorized craft culture – cottage industries – the sister design duo reevaluated the sturdy attire worn by tradesman today and in the past – beekeepers, roadsweeper, chemists, mechanics, milkman and couriers. Playing against the paradox of mass production and individuality, Erica and Faye equate the ‘treadmill’ of fashion’s season-based turn out with hard industry.

With such a straightforward aim, the duo developed a bespoke series of cloaks, trenches and topcoats. Each piece evokes a different occupation through distinctly cut shapes and laden material combinations. Fascinated by the value gained through ware and tare, Erica dipped oil-rigger iterations in black rubber and allowed a mechanic-inspired piece to crackle over time.
 
Adrian Madlener
 
studiotoogood.com
 
Adrian Madlener, a recent graduate of the Design Academy Eindhoven, is a designer turned journalist. Originally from Belgium, he grew up in New York where an early interest in architecture exposed him to a wide range of creative disciplines; everything from contemporary dance to fine art, and eventually design. During his studies in Eindhoven, Adrian discovered that his true calling lays within design theory, history, and criticism. Though writing is his best design tool, he still gains great satisfaction from sketching, modeling, and experimenting with material. The critic should create to critique.
 
www.adrianmadlener.com


 
Photos courtesy of Studio Toogood

Photos courtesy of Studio Toogood

 

Photos courtesy of Studio Toogood

Photos courtesy of Studio Toogood

 

Photo courtesy of Studio Toogood

Photo courtesy of Studio Toogood

 

Photos courtesy of Studio Toogood

Photos courtesy of Studio Toogood


MILAN THE SALONE

liquid stone #milan2014

 

CaCO3 Detail - photo by Floor Knappen

Milan was filled with marbles this year, the decorative stone made everyone whisper of the return of Memphis, however few designers achieved in mesmerizing with eclectic usage of materials.
 
A new form of anti design was present in the works of designers duo Thomas Vailly and Laura Lynn Jansen who showcased their 'CaCO3 - Stoneware' project in the Dutch Invertuals exhibition during Salone del Mobile.
 
An intriguing project in which they researched if stone could be cultivated into a desired shape. Inspired by geological processes of stalactites’ growth, their stone objects are grown around structures, drop by drop. The fragile skeleton, a 3D printed structure, is left to petrify for weeks in specially chosen thermo-mineral springs with high amounts of minerals – Calcium Carbonate CaCO3. The natural geological processes reinforce and randomly thicken the ethereal structure and give birth to geologically engineered stoneware, fossils of a new kind.

Sottsass and company, who fought against the idea of products developed purely based on function, would have enjoyed Vailly and Jansen attempt to launch a contemporary form of playfulness in the production of characteristic objects.
 
www.vailly.com
 
www.lauralynnjansen.com
 
Jules van den Langenberg graduated at Design Academy Eindhoven and developed himself as design curator and exhibition maker through self initiated projects and freelance works. Jules initiates-, designs-, curates- and exhibits projects in which applied art and design are used as a medium to cultivate culture. Through associative thinking the young Willy Wonka develops narratives and concepts which form fundaments for a variety of curatorial projects.
 
www.julesvandenlangenberg.nl

Left: photo by thomas vailly - Right : photo by Floor Knappen

Left: photo by thomas vailly - Right : photo by Floor Knappen

 

Thomas Vailly & Laura Lynn Jansen at Dutch Invertuals - photo by raw color

Thomas Vailly & Laura Lynn Jansen at Dutch Invertuals - photo by raw color

 

Left :Thomas Vailly & Laura Lynn Jansen at Dutch Invertuals - photo by raw color Right - Stoneware - photo by Floor Knappen

Left :Thomas Vailly & Laura Lynn Jansen at Dutch Invertuals - photo by raw color - Right - Stoneware - photo by Floor Knappen


MILAN THE SALONE

re-use by rENs #milan2014

rENs + Desso photos by Lisa Klappe

rENs + Desso photos by Lisa Klappe

 

The power of creativity can give products a new life. Exciting new concepts and designs are imagined from existing materials or products.This year in Milan we saw recycled marble dust used for homeware, reclaimed oak from old barns used for stool by Endo for Emeco and the poetic "re-vive" collection by rENs for Desso.

 

The Dutch design team have recently worked on a number of projects developing the concept of using red dye to refashion existing products. For rENs this colour sends a signal about the problem of waste.

 

With Desso the carpet manufacture, they launched a rug collection - re-vive- transforming out-of-date carpets into new, vibrant products. By re-colouring them rENs provide unique shades and effects for each rug. It avoids the products come to an end and possibly finish up as waste.

The hand crafted process gives each rug its own identity and renewed creative life. In via Lambrate the Dutch design team was doing live performance to a fascinated audience.

 

This is a new sustainable model for business and manufacturing where smart design can recycle, reuse and remanufacture, imagination is used to find better ways to make things.

 

Cécile Poignant

 

www.rens-desso.com

 

 

re-vive by rENs and Desso  photo by Sanne Veltman
re-vive by rENs and Desso photo by Sanne Veltman

 

 

rENs  @vialambrate photos cecile poignant

rENs @vialambrate photos cecile poignant

 

rENs @vialambrate photos cecile poignant

rENs @vialambrate photos cecile poignant

 

rENs + Desso photos by Sanne Veltman

rENs + Desso photos by Sanne Veltman

 


MILAN THE SALONE

decentralized design & production #milan 2013

 

Minale Maeda Inside Out Furniture - Photo by Marit Kramer

Minale Maeda Inside Out Furniture - Photo by Marit Kramer

 

Jules van den Langenberg recently graduated at Design Academy Eindhoven. His fascination for cultivating culture led to the establishment of a nomadic production house, a traveling studio in which Jules initiates and curates design processes. The young -Willy Wonka like- cult industrialist works on the development of two projects in the context of Dutch Design. Besides this he is developing his skills as designer of dialogues / cultural entrepreneur / design curator through freelance works in exhibition making, concept development and spin-doctoring. In October Jules' nomadic production house will be present at Dutch Design Week 2013. During Salone del Mobile in Milan,  Jules shares with us some of his discoveries and « coup de coeur ».

 

Included in the NOMADISMI exhibition at Altai Gallery, Studio Minale-Maeda's Inside Out Furniture points out one of the characteristics of the current third industrial revolution; decentralized design- and production. The designersduo consisting of Kuniko Maeda (Japan) and Mario Minale (Italy) developed a range of furniture pieces that can be produced on any location in the world where a drill, wood saw, 3d printer and some wood are available. Thus enabling consumers of their design to arrange production themselves on a local level. Drifting away from the concept of having power on a central location to making users the authority.  Mario Minale introduces explains: "designed specifically to be downloadable in order to reduce environmental issues related to transport, costs of stock keeping and explore collaborative design and distribution, this furniture can be edited in size and materials, is made on location or can be self-made by downloading the blueprints. The concept was to turn the pieces inside out to make construction simple and transparent, while brackets and structural details become distinctive features. The connections are 3d printed to suit various sizes of wood, and the crafting is minimal requiring only cutting to length and drilling of standard wooden plate and beam materials."

 

This sense of nomadic production is embedded in the work of several other contemporary designers and artists. Amongst others design studio Unfold, founded by Claire Warnier (Belgium) and Dries Verbruggen (Belgium), which is renowned for it's projects on ceramic 3d printing. The designers have further developed their reseach of producing porcelain pieces with a clay extrusion printer, and the implications this production method has on design and manufacturing, in a project titled Statigraphic Manufactury.

"Stratigraphic Manufactury is a new model for the distribution and digital manufacturing of porcelain, which includes local small manufacturing units that are globally connected. One that embraces local production variations and influences. A set of digital 3d files of designs presented last spring in Milan by Unfold have been e-mailed to various manufacturers around the world who have acquired the 3d printing production method that Unfold pioneered and open sourced in 2009. They were instructed not to alter the digital files but were free to incorporate personal and local influences and interpretations during the production" states Unfold.

 

The psychical results of the experiment made by  an international group of 'printer producers', or should we say 'printer craftsman', were presented at the Istanbul Design Biennial. Following the principle as defined by Unfold, Jonathan Keep (UK), Eran Gal-Or (Israel), Tulya Madra and Firat Aykac (Turkey) and Mustafa Canyurt (Turkey) and Claire Warnier and Dries Verbruggen themselves(Belgium) showcased their efforts of transforming the 3d files into tactile pieces of porcelain.

 

The small alterations in the making, simply occurring because of the usage of different human brains and hands, resulted into a range of porcelain items that illustrate the individuals by whom the pieces were locally produced. A beautiful display of how the concept of decentralized design- and production, recently added to the vocabulary of design, could function in a world that is becoming a network of small-scale authorities.

 

 

This article marks the end of the Salone del Mobile 2013 review series by Jules van den Langenberg. We hope you enjoyed the serie!

 

 

 

minale-maeda.com

unfold.be

www.keep-art.co.uk

www.mosantimetre.com

www.artussanat.com

www.cultivatingculture.nl

 

Minale Maeda Inside Out Furniture - Photo by Marit Kramer

Minale Maeda Inside Out Furniture - Photo by Marit Kramer

 

Startigraphic Manufactury Istanbul

Startigraphic Manufactury Istanbul

 

Startigraphic Manufactury Istanbul

Startigraphic Manufactury Istanbul

 

Startigraphic Manufactury Istanbul

Startigraphic Manufactury Istanbul

 

Startigraphic Manufactury Istanbul

Startigraphic Manufactury Istanbul


MILAN THE SALONE

Everything-you-can-pack-neatly-in-a-bag-for-a-week-away

 

photo by Stefano 'Mr. Tuft' Carloni

photo by Stefano 'Mr. Tuft' Carloni

 

Jules van den Langenberg recently graduated at Design Academy Eindhoven. His fascination for cultivating culture led to the establishment of a nomadic production house, a traveling studio in which Jules initiates and curates design processes. The young -Willy Wonka like- cult industrialist works on the development of two projects in the context of Dutch Design. Besides this he is developing his skills as designer of dialogues / cultural entrepreneur / design curator through freelance works in exhibition making, concept development and spin-doctoring. In October Jules' nomadic production house will be present at Dutch Design Week 2013. During Salone del Mobile in Milan,  Jules shares with us some of his discoveries and « coup de coeur ».

 

Within an immense environment of a reconstructed 19th Century Railway Station at MOST, in the Museum of Science and Technology, Tom Dixon and Adidas presented a preview of their collaboration project during the Salone del Mobile. This reveal marks the beginning of a two-year partnership during which four new product collections of apparel, luggage and footwear will be launched, the first hitting global retailers in January 2014. The Milan Museum encapsulates the history of industrial travel and design, creating an appropriate and dynamic backdrop for the presentation of their project.

 

The capsule collection 'everything-you-can-pack-neatly-in-a-bag-for-a-week-away' provides the contemporary global citizen with a utilitarian yet aesthetically pleasing set of clothes that is based on flat packing,  expandability and multi-functionality. A workwear wardrobe full of grayish pastels combined with intense blues and yellows in which the skills of industrial designer Dixon and the qualities of sportswear company Adidas merged.

"Premiering new typologies of bags and apparel, the base of the collection comprises two travel bags typologies – the hard and the soft – an experiment in capsule thinking in which luggage unclasps, unzips and unfolds to reveal multiple layers. Inside, the bags reveal a complete kit of parts for our week long stay in Italy – neatly, crisply and compactly folded with maximum efficiency to provide a complete wardrobe for every possible occasion." states Tom Dixon.

 

Noteworthy pieces from the collection are the Multi Purpose Suits, the Flat Pack Shoes and the Down Coat Sleeping Bag.

 

To be flat-packed in your travel bags, the light weight Flat Pack Shoes are made of a firm base to which a textile is attached that is flexible enough so it can be bend around your ankle. The ingenious construction of the shoe is presented in Milan by showcasing the few elements that need to be assembled to construct the footwear. Worn as a comfortable second skin, the 'Down Coat Sleeping Bag' enables its user to stay the night spontaneously. The coat's double function lining can be unfolded- and transformed into a sleeping bag.

 

Both enabling a nomadic lifestyle.

 

 

adidas.com

www.tomdixon.net

www.mrtuft.tumblr.com

www.cultivatingculture.nl

 

photo by Stefano 'Mr. Tuft' Carloni

photo by Stefano 'Mr. Tuft' Carloni

 

photo by Stefano 'Mr. Tuft' Carloni

photo by Stefano 'Mr. Tuft' Carloni

 

photo by Stefano 'Mr. Tuft' Carloni

photo by Stefano 'Mr. Tuft' Carloni

 

photo by Stefano 'Mr. Tuft' Carloni

photo by Stefano 'Mr. Tuft' Carloni

 

photo by Stefano 'Mr. Tuft' Carloni

photo by Stefano 'Mr. Tuft' Carloni

 

photo by Stefano 'Mr. Tuft' Carloni

photo by Stefano 'Mr. Tuft' Carloni

 

photo by Stefano 'Mr. Tuft' Carloni

photo by Stefano 'Mr. Tuft' Carloni

 

photo by Stefano 'Mr. Tuft' Carloni

photo by Stefano 'Mr. Tuft' Carloni

 

photo by Stefano 'Mr. Tuft' Carloni

photo by Stefano 'Mr. Tuft' Carloni

 

photo by Stefano 'Mr. Tuft' Carloni

photo by Stefano 'Mr. Tuft' Carloni

 

 


MILAN THE SALONE

craft means investing time in something #milan2013

 

Jules van den Langenberg recently graduated at Design Academy Eindhoven. His fascination for cultivating culture led to the establishment of a nomadic production house, a traveling studio in which Jules initiates and curates design processes. The young -Willy Wonka like- cult industrialist works on the development of two projects in the context of Dutch Design. Besides this he is developing his skills as designer of dialogues / cultural entrepreneur / design curator through freelance works in exhibition making, concept development and spin-doctoring. In October Jules' nomadic production house will be present at Dutch Design Week 2013. During Salone del Mobile in Milan,  Jules shares with us some of his discoveries and « coup de coeur ».

 

The Rossana Orlandi premises were once again filled with numerous Dutch designers, established names such as Piet Hein Eek and Scholten & Baijings and members of the younger generation like BCXSY and Wonmin Park all presented their latest works.

 

Also present since a few years at Orlandi's haven is Dutch publisher and distributor of contemporary design products Thomas Eyck who invited Dick van Hoff to work on a series of products for his t.e. label. Eyck, a sensitive businessman, is known for his careful process of product development in which the union of material  and design is essential. He commissioned van Hoff to design a series of products based on leather. The outcome of a years work is a collection that consists of a chair, a daybed, a firewood bag and a brief case, a triple-bag and a lunch set. "The designs are archetypes that capture your heart, they are robust in shape with subtle detailing. Dick van Hoff draws existing dogmas into question and offers new ways of going through our daily routine. As he calls it: “decelerate to accelerate”. The products invite you to refresh your mind: have a lie down on your daybed and on leaving the house take your bag and lunch box along to enjoy nature on the chair which sits you right down in the grass." states Thomas Eyck.

Van Hoff is known for his steady stream of exquisitely crafted and rigorously produced objects for both his own studio and other companies. Through his own work and as tutor at Design Academy Eindhoven, Dick van Hoff has played a major role in shaping the future of a post- Droog Dutch school of design thinking. His promotion of fine craftsmanship coupled with industrial techniques has forged a revived interest in the modernist principals of form, function and appropriateness. Paired with Thomas Eyck's vision on the production of the pieces,  according to who production should take place in The Netherlands to keep producers involved and easily accessible in person, the latest t.e. series is the outcome of a collaborative result. Materials and techniques have been chosen with the outmost care and for this occasion specialists at “De Buffel” leatherworks and “Kuperus & Gardenier” carpentry produced the pieces.

 

Remarkable is the attention that went into the construction of the pieces in which van Hoff took the behavior of the leather over time into account. The leather surfaces of the chair and daybed are therefore made in such a way that after a period of usage, in which the material will become softer and loose tension, it can be re-stretched over the wooden frames using leathers straps and black metal buckles. Material and design make sense.

 

 

thomaseyck.nl

www.vanhoffontwerpen.nl

www.rossanaorlandi.com

www.cultivatingculture.nl

 

 


MILAN THE SALONE

the family of fun #milan2013

 

Pussel project - Apparatu

 

Jules van den Langenberg recently graduated at Design Academy Eindhoven. His fascination for cultivating culture led to the establishment of a nomadic production house, a traveling studio in which Jules initiates and curates design processes. The young -Willy Wonka like- cult industrialist works on the development of two projects in the context of Dutch Design. Besides this he is developing his skills as designer of dialogues / cultural entrepreneur / design curator through freelance works in exhibition making, concept development and spin-doctoring. In October Jules' nomadic production house will be present at Dutch Design Week 2013. During Salone del Mobile in Milan,  Jules shares with us some of his discoveries and « coup de coeur ».

 

In the domesticated jungle called Salone Internazionale del Mobile meeting the Mañosa family was a welcome breeze of down to earth design methodology. The warm hearted Spanish family have established their company called 'Apparatu' and work on self initiated- as well as commissioned projects in ceramics. Xavier Mañosa, son of the family (designer) works with his father (experienced ceramist) and mother (glazing expert) on creations out of clay. The collaborative efforts of the family are represented in the 'Pussel' project that is displayed throughout the stand of Spanish furniture label Kettal. Their small scale modular ceramic objects compliment the furniture and bring a sense of liveliness to the environment."Pussel began as a game between 12-year-old Xavier and his father. Together they created a ceramic modular shape that you could stack together mixing different colours. This game, measuring a metre and half, was mutated over time by Xavier Mañosa, who took his references from children’s modular puzzles, where shape, colour and materials intermingle with their various functions as lamp, vase and candle holder.

 

An object made in Barcelona using entirely traditional methods with painstaking detailing and finishing. Made from high-temperature ceramic and blown glass." Apparatu states.

That funk is running in the family becomes apparent in the 'Scotch Club' project that is also presented at the fairgrounds, presented at Spanish lighting label Marset. The Scotch Club ceramic collection, consisting of  severals lights, is designed by Xavier Mañosa in collaboration with design studio Mashallah and is the result of a long-distance creative correspondence between Berlin- based Mashallah and Mañosa’s studio in Barcelona. It began with the creation on the computer of a geometric mass, which was then broken down into discrete polygons to be printed on paper and faxed to Barcelona. Upon receipt, Mañosa applied a coat of resin to stiffen the paper and reconstructed the original shape, from which he produced a plaster mould to facilitate the manufacture of the ceramics. One could say the finished product represents the fruit of the nervous tension between the digital and the handcrafted worlds: designed on a computer, transmitted by the technologically obsolete fax, and finally produced in a kiln.

 

The Scotch Club ceramic collection takes its inspiration from a discotheque, with a design reminiscent of the widely popular revolving disco ball. Its 72 faces reflect light from the interior in all directions, casting elegant, complex visual patterns around the room. "Towards the end of 1959, in Aachen, Germany, the now-famous "Scotch Club" had its opening night. The owner, seeing that the patrons were growing bored, asked a journalist to announce the songs as they were played; this was the birth of the discotheque as we know it today." Xavier explains.

 

www.apparatu.com

www.kettal.es

www.marset.com

www.mashallah.nu

www.cultivatingculture.nl

 

 

Pussel project - Apparatu

 

Scotch Club project - photo by Jara Varela

 

Scotch Club project - photo by Jara Varela


MILAN THE SALONE

cluttered up clouds #milan2013

photos by Studio Maarten Kolk & Guus Kusters

photos by Studio Maarten Kolk & Guus Kusters

 

Jules van den Langenberg recently graduated at Design Academy Eindhoven. His fascination for cultivating culture led to the establishment of a nomadic production house, a traveling studio in which Jules initiates and curates design processes. The young -Willy Wonka like- cult industrialist works on the development of two projects in the context of Dutch Design. Besides this he is developing his skills as designer of dialogues / cultural entrepreneur / design curator through freelance works in exhibition making, concept development and spin-doctoring. In October Jules' nomadic production house will be present at Dutch Design Week 2013. During Salone del Mobile in Milan,  Jules shares with us some of his discoveries and « coup de coeur ».

 

The focus on work, in domestic context as well as for the office- and public space, can be felt all over Milan. Several brands and design labels are presenting worlds in which a new nature of work is manifested. The PROOFFLab series, initiated by PROOFF, presented the first results of a study concerning sound and space. As artistic directing office of PROOFFLab, Studio Makkink & Bey invited the Belgian collective Jij's and Dutch design studio Maarten Kolk & Guus Kusters to work in a so called 'tandem'. Both started the design process from the topic 'acoustics'.

 

Designers Kolk & Kusters, distillers of nature's poetry, managed to blend multi-functionality with aesthetics in their project titled 'Cloud Boxes'. “Thinking about acoustics we realized quickly that silence wasn’t our goal in this project. It isn’t that bad to have sound around you when you’re working. It starts to be disturbing when sound becomes noise. Taking away sound doesn’t create silence; it just changes your definition of noise. We imagined our perfect solution should be like mist; a low-hanging cloud that doesn’t make the world around you disappear, but takes the sharp edges off and makes everything a little softer.” explains Guus Kusters.

In the PROOFFlab space five boxes are presented that are made of semi-transparent latex and that can be opened by stretching the material. The small, medium and large Cloud Boxes are made to store office clutter and damp sound as well as visual noise. Blurred silhouettes of color are visible inside the storage units and allow people to navigate intuitively through their office tools.

“We tried to leave the functionality of the boxes quite undefined. We made three different sizes according to the different scales of office clutter. All boxes can be opened from multiple sides, so people can play with the functionality of them. The large Cloud Box for example can be opened from four different sides. This gives one the opportunity to give each side a different function; one side could contain general office accessories, the next side binders of a specific employee, another side cleaning supplies and so on. The medium sized Cloud Box can be placed on a desk or in an existing cabinet fading your administration, calculator or desk lamp. And small version can contain small things like pens, phone charger or your personal stock of tea bags. The handle inside makes it easy to take with you if you don’t have your own desk.”

 

As the 'Cloud Boxes' project is a study within PROOFFLab it should be concerned as the fundament on which similar or other ideas can be developed. The studies could be used as meaningful conversation pieces and can eventually be translated into actual products for the PROOFF label that aims to give form to the contemporary- and future work landscape.

 

 

www.proofflab.com

 

maartenkolk-guuskusters.tumblr.com

 

www.studiomakkinkbey.nl

 

www.jijs.be

 

www.cultivatingculture.nl

 

 

PROOFF@Tortona Design Week 2013

PROOFF@Tortona Design Week 2013

 

PROOFF@Tortona Design Week 2013

PROOFF@Tortona Design Week 2013

 

PROOFF@Tortona Design Week 2013

PROOFF@Tortona Design Week 2013

 

PROOFF@Tortona Design Week 2013

PROOFF@Tortona Design Week 2013

 

PROOFF@Tortona Design Week 2013

PROOFF@Tortona Design Week 2013


MILAN THE SALONE

mass-browsing art and design #milan2013

 

Rafael Roozendaal

Rafael Roozendaal

 

 

Jules van den Langenberg is recently graduated at Design Academy Eindhoven. His fascination for cultivating culture led to the establishment of a nomadic production house, a traveling studio in which Jules initiates and curates design processes. The young -Willy Wonka like- cult industrialist works on the development of two projects in the context of Dutch Design. Besides this he is developing his skills as designer of dialogues / cultural entrepreneur / design curator through freelance works in exhibition making, concept development and spin-doctoring. In October Jules' nomadic production house will be present at Dutch Design Week 2013. During Salone del Mobile in Milan,  Jules shares with us some of his discoveries and « coup de coeur ».

 

Walking through the crowded streets of Via Tortona, with pop-up exhibitions all around, I noticed the mass-browsing that is going in Milan. The enormous amounts of design on display is as inspirational as it is overwhelming. I suddenly feel in need of a digital layer over the analogue fair. A zone in which we could pre- and post-discover the efforts of the exhibitors. A place where everyone could be curating the curated. This traveling between reality and virtuality reminded me of the BYOB (Bring Your Own Beamer) one-night exhibitions, an initiative and concept of visual artist Rafaël Roozendaal, where artists are invited to bring their own beamers and show their own work, exploring the medium of projection. Conceived as an open idea that anyone can borrow, the first BYOB took place in 2010 in Berlin and so far 124 editions took place in a variety of cities all over the world.

 

Amongst others Rafaël's artistic practice consists of websites and installations.  In his works the artist is looking for a weird state of mind, somewhere between boredom and fascination. "It is the point of view of an observer, quietly enjoying what's around" explains Rafaël. He uses the internet as his canvas which means that he attracts a large online audience, over 40 million visits per year.

"I always loved this idea of an artwork that exists continuously and on demand, anywhere in the world. Isnt that magical? You type a magic spell, (domain name), and there it is, right in front of you! I feel blessed to live in this time, it allows me to make a lot of works yet remain completely mobile. I enjoy moving around, wether its a short trip or living somewhere for a longer time. I like seeing how different countries and cultures operate. Most humans have the same needs but we all find different solutions." When a digital artpiece is bought the buyer becomes owner of the domain name. "Domain names can't be forged, they are one of the internets few scarcities. This makes them valuable. The name of the collector is then listen in the title bar."

 

In 2012 Rafaël collaborated with Calvin Klein on an installation in which art, technology and fashion blend, the 'Without Hesitation' installation in Tokyo functioned as context in which an event took place. "Calvin Klein was interested in presenting their collection together with art, to create an interesting and meaningful event. I think the worlds eyes are more and more pointed to technology and art, it is an exciting field. CK wanted to benefit from that energy, and I was happy to be part of what they do. They asked me to make something related to my previous art exhibitions. With their budget, I was able to work on a much bigger and more professional scale. I hope there will be more fashion collaborations in the future!"

 

 

www.byobworldwide.com

 

www.newrafael.com

 

www.intotime.us

 

www.cultivatingculture.nl

 

Rafael Roozendaal

Rafael Roozendaal

 

Rafael Roozendaal

Rafael Roozendaal

 

Rafael Roozendaal

Rafael Roozendaal

 

Rafael Roozendaal

Rafael Roozendaal

 

Rafael Roozendaal

Rafael Roozendaal

 

Rafael Roozendaal

Rafael Roozendaal


MILAN THE SALONE

trends report -2- #milan2012

MACHINE PROUD. Some designers are collaborating with their machines, inviting them into the design process and proudly telling their story.  The revival of industrial production is burgeoning.

Tom Dixon appropriately chose the Museum of Science & Technology as the venue to show his work, including TRUMPH’s enormous machine performing live for the public and cutting out his designs. Other designers used wheels, spokes, nuts and bolts to create production-line settings, demonstrating live like scientists growing new matter.  Innovative form-shaping techniques included the use of magnets by Jólan van den Wiel in his ‘Gravity Stool’.
Research by Anaëlle Madec - Text by Philip Fimmano

openstructures.net 

thomas-maincent.com

bytomm.com

ettlabenn.com

jolanvanderwiel.nl

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KNIT & WEAVE. We live at a time defined by connectivity and networking, and this is reflected by the importance of knitting and weaving techniques influencing the design scene. Interwoven into the fabric of the object, these items evoke a sense of warmness and the handmade, even when produced on a serial level.

 

Lara Knutson incorporates glass particles into her fibres when knitting her vases and recipients, giving her work an iridescent quality when light shines upon it. Kwangho Lee continues to masterfully knit objects, and this year unveiled two halves of a chair in different materials, one of which is made of leather strands partly dipped in an electric blue coating. Peter Marigold incorporated knit fibres into a monumental wooden work he produced with the Hinoki-Kogei furniture company for the Japan Creative exhibit.

 

Weaving was also an important trend yet again in Milan, presented by Éléanore Nalet working in textile for Ligne Roset, Siren Elise Wilhelmsen working in felt, and Lukas Dahlén working in wood.

Research by Anaëlle Madec - Text by Philip Fimmano

eleonorenalet.com

lukasdahlen.se

sirenelisewilhelmsen.com
loredanabonora.it
laraknutson.blogspot.fr
missonihome.it

petermarigold.com

kwangholee.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


MILAN THE SALONE

trends report -1- #milan2012

 

Despite 2012 being a year where the usual Salone stand-out moments were rare and far between, many new products and concepts formulate a fresh picture about where design is headed: life is in the details.

Trend Tablet takes a look at the different trends that emerged this year in Milan, the many sums of which make an interesting whole.

 

Research by Anaëlle Madec - Text by Philip Fimmano

 

 

katrin greiling

 

TAKING SHELTER A nomadic current is influencing lifestyle, ignited by people’s free and wireless existence, but also nourished by the revival of outdoor sports, utilitarian fashions and luxury camping.

Katrin Greiling’s daybed that uses a quilt for shelter was shown at Kvadrat; the Danish weaver invited contemporary designers to celebrate their most famous textile, ‘Hallingdal 65’ by Nanna Ditzel.Also featured were Marti Guixé who buffered his sofa with upholstered walls, Jonah Takagi who created a canapé over a daybed, and Mermelada Studio who made a funky textile tepee.

At Wallpaper’s ‘Handmade’ exhibition, Louis Vuitton stayed true to its travel roots, unveiling a luxurious tent fit for the most elegant of nomads.

 

www.katringreiling.com
www.guixe.com

 

 

marti guixe

croatian holiday

louis vuitton

 

TRANSFORMING MATERIALS The sustainable idea of recycling has become ingrained in the work of today’s designers; but also an ethos that consumers everywhere respond to. As the movement matures, designers seem to be interested in investigating new tactilities and surfaces, researching how to transform materials and reincarnate them several times.

The use of paper and pulp continues to entice: this year, Ontwerpduo launched a small versatile shelving unit made of paper planks and Studio Pinwu created frothy furniture and an elegant conic lampshade. Concrete’s aspects were represented in pulp by many designers, including ett la benn in their ‘Spin Making’ still life series.

Jo Meesters encrusted seeds into his earthy recipients, allowing them to sprout like magic beans over time; poetically incorporating nature into the design process. Used coffee powder was converted into spiritual domes, pressed out by Raul Lauri and revealing the beautiful strata of its layers. Human hair too became a material to study, as mixed with glycerine and sodium sulphate by Thomas Vailly and rolled into a cup, jug, mirror and lamp.

Plastic shopping bags were reinterpreted at the Polyfloss Factory and by Plastic Fantastic, as shown at the Supercylcers collective exhibit of sustainable techniques (curated by Sarah K). Wood shavings and other waste collected from the Royal College’s workshops was converted into archaic-looking pencils by Ariane Prin. Plastic resins were transformed into new kinds of marble and granite, as seen notably in the work if Studio Swine, Silo Studio and Hilda Hellström.

 

www.ettlabenn.com
www.supercyclers.com
www.jomeesters.nl
www.teteknecht.com
www.rlauri.com
www.studioswine.com
hildahellstrom.tumblr.com

 

 

 

ett la benn

 

supercyclers

 

jo meesters

 

tetê knecht

 

raoul lauri

 


MILAN THE SALONE

back home #milan2012

 

Antonio Aricò

 

 

 

After studying in Milan and abroad, Antonio Aricò began his career at Deepdesign creating concepts for Barilla, Nivea, Lavazza and Skitch; yet this friendly and cheerful designer found that a certain fulfilling element was missing in his life. Following a chance meeting with Lidewij Edelkoort in 2008, he was inspired to follow his intuition and return to his southern Calabrian roots, spending time with his grandfather Saverio Zaminga to learn the art of furniture making and rediscover his identity, taking the appropriate time needed to develop an interesting collection that was shown in Ventura Lambrate during 2012's Salone Internazionale del Mobile.

 

The 'Back Home' collection includes benches, chairs and side tables made from wenge wood and beech, which the designer has dressed in various stains and wax finishes. Their rounded simplicity is dry yet humorous; in their lighthearted originality and generosity, they bring a fresh perspective to an otherwise saturated chair market.

Also on offer are a bookshelf unit and desk, unique lamp propositions, accessories and the 'Welcome Tree Carpet', a textile rug which gives plants the opportunity to become the centre of attention by incorporating a niche into its weave.

 

Created with passion and savoir-faire, Aricò's furniture is an inviting, casual and unpretentious rendition of contemporary artisan woodworking. As if nurtured by the 'Watering Kettle Can' that Aricò developed in 2011, his new work is the blossoming growth after a lengthy gestation period in which the designer has successfully merged his authenticity with a love for materials and nature; translating the handmade into a slick and stylish family of products. Aricò hasn't started a movement yet, but his is definitely part of one.

Text by Philip Fimmano

 

www.antonioarico.com

 

 

BACK HOME_ WELOME TREE CARPET_PHOTO FEDELE ZAMINGA

photo by fedele zaminga

 

photos by fedele zaminga

photos by fedele zaminga

 

photos by fedele zaminga

photos by fedele zaminga

 

photos by fedele zaminga

photos by fedele zaminga

 

 


MILAN THE SALONE

WWIII / Furnication #milan2012

 

 

WWIII / Furnication, is an exhibition of 12,5 years of collaboration between Lensvelt and Atelier Van Lieshout.

Visit it during the Salone del Mobile  @ Via Privata Oslavia 1, Ventura Lambrate, Milan.

www.lensvelt.nl

 

 

www.ateliervanlieshout.com

 


MILAN THE SALONE

the conceptual concept car #milan2012

Scholten & Baijings - Mini One

photos courtesy Mini

 

Whenever designers are asked to “do” a concept car, the implicit idea is to choose a colour, design a new textile and invent a few trims to co-brand the vehicle in order to create sales traffic; a purely marketing-driven strategy which so far has never proven to generate more income. Most of the time, luxury houses and fashion designers are requested to envelop the car body with a corporate ribbon or to change the interior into a mobile vanity case for driving females.

 

Therefore it is rather remarkable that when Adrian van Hooydonk, head of design at BMW, approached the designers Scholten & Baijings to formulate a new vision of the hugely successful Mini, he gave them carte blanche to do whatever they wanted; a statement about their relationship with the car, a product that somehow reflected the car, an installation around the car… everything was possible, it was an open invitation.

 

Van Hooydonk knew little of what was going to happen, he clearly underestimated what he was doing. Throwing such a bone to the two designers was not a wasted effort and straight away, Carole and Stefan went to work gnawing at the bone, toying with the bone, and treating the bone as a fetish object to understand its ritual properties, until the Mini was stripped bare – at once nude and beautiful.

 

Like eager kids, they tinkered with the car and took it apart to the very last detail, undressing the Mini as if it was an onion and peeling away layer after layer: from the coloured layer to the protective layer, to the textile layer, to the final motor layer, until the car became of a strangely powerful essence, able to accept and endorse the different design interventions that would reconstitute it. The extreme minimalism of the Mini became palpable. Bare and fragile, the little car stood in front of them, endearing to them with its entrails and inner workings, begging them to be clothed in a better dress and coloured in a different colour; to be given some accessories also, inviting them to be audacious in their reflections on what makes a car for the future.

 

With their signature curiosity, the designers started to ask elementary questions such as why is a wheel a wheel and produced in so many facets, why is the door as heavy as it is, and why does colour have to be solid? Why do windows have views and why are the fabrics neutral? Why does a car still seem to be the same car after so many decades? They grabbed their chance and decided to draw a sketch they didn't have to test drive, to narrate a draft that didn't need to tell stories, to master a blueprint that didn't need to be realised. They created a one-on-one sketchbook for a car where the process was the design laid bare. For the sake of research, they chose for abstraction.

 

Colour was going to be given through material and texture, details were going to be singled out for their design beauty, wheels were chosen as icons, the interior would be folded out of one piece with a personalised interface for sound and display.

The bumpers would be subjected to fluorescent pigment, thus behaving almost as art objects.The doors would be reconstructed from gold-sprayed crinkled cardboard, and all safety belts woven in gold and soft pink geometrics. Furthermore, concerned with space and efficiency, the designers created huge nomadic pockets that can be attached with magnets for storage, and become luggage at the same time. Needless to say, these items profit from the same colour accents that are distributed throughout the rest of Scholten & Baijings’ design process: the inner door is gold, the outer hue a greyish blue, the bumper a vivid fluorescent and the dashboard powder-coated in bright red, as if their Mini is a woman putting on some blush. The outer shell is transformed with porcelain lacquer, perforated by a myriad of tiny little holes to create an organic system of ventilation and to experience fragrance from the sides of the road, influencing and enhancing driving pleasure.

 

The chairs are streamlined and made ultra-thin, to give a much bigger sense of space in such a little car body, covered in woven canvas designed using fluorescent accents and soft grey leather that is embroidered with metal yarns so that it looks like armour. All textiles and samples were executed in the designers’ own ateliers, where all ideas are creation. Scholten & Baijings firmly believe that the design process is not just a thought process yet also a work in process, enabling them to learn from making and the using of hands.

 

They do not follow the rules yet question them in order to come to innovation.The steering wheel is moulded in a single piece of broken white, bone-type plastic while the wheels are completely reinvented to become solid, made within one process using transparent synthetic matter and rubber tires; why had the tire industry never been questioned so ever before?

 

Herein lays the strength of the project: in one continuous process of observation, the status quo of what a car and its components are is investigated, delivering reflection and research for years to come. Scholten & Bajings have defined their Mini as a driving laboratory, a cutting edge vehicle on the road to other yet unknown destinations. Honk! Honk!

 

Lidewij Edelkoort, april 2012

 

The exhibition is located at Via Festa del Perdono 7, Milan 20122, until april 28.

 

 

Full Press Release 

 

 

www.scholtenbaijings.com

 

 

Scholten & Baijings Mini One

photo courtesy Mini

 


MILAN THE SALONE

front design @ rossana orlandi #milan2012

design by Front

design by Front

 

Booo! (a design studio based in Eindhoven) has invited Nacho Carbonell, FormaFantasma and FRONT to innovate new concepts for LED light bulbs. These inexpensive yet fantastic products were shown today at Spazio Rossana Orlandi, offering aesthetic forms which in themselves become lamps.

Front's bulbs were embodied in one poetic bubble-blowing version, morphing into new organic shapes every few seconds.

Text by Philip Fimmano, april 2012

 

www.designfront.org

 

 


MILAN THE SALONE

wood, bamboo & pulp #milan2011

photo Salone Milan 2011

Wood, bamboo & pulp continued to be major materials of choice at various locations throughout the city.

This sustainable thread quietly wove its way through the city’s Fuori Salone events, notably in Gijs Bakker’s selection for Yii at the Triennale and the Design Academy Eindhoven’s impressive exhibition curated by Ilse Crawford.

 

Wood was even turned into a washable textile by young Academy graduate Lenneke Langenhuijsen, while cork was transformed by several innovative designers for Amorim and Experimenta Design at their Materia exhibition in the Brera. April 2011

 

 

www.fritsch-associes.com

www.stevenbanken.nl

www.campanas.com.br

 

www.resign.it/academy

www.willshannon.co.

www.kasparhamacher.be

www.matyldakrzykowski.com

www.tlalit.com

www.elisastrozyk.de

www.lennekelangenhuijsen.com

www.raw-edges.com

 

Photo Salone Milan 2011

 

 

photo Salone Milan 2011

 

 

photo Milan Salone 2011

 

 

photo Milan Salone 2011

 

 

photo Milan Salone 2011

 

 

Photo Milan salone 2011

 

 

photo Milan Salone 2011


MILAN THE SALONE

weaving #milan2011

A revival of basket weaving is in the air, with grass and straw being intertwined by several designers.  Craft collectives collaborate with young designers to bring a hand-made quality to products, while new ways of knitting cord and crocheting textile emerge.

www.innovo-design.com

www.nocc.fr

www.wadebe.com

www.marcsadler.it

www.tordboontje.com

www.smjd.nl

 

photo by innovo design

photos by anaëlle madec

photos by anaëlle madec

 

photo by marc sadlerphoto by anaëlle madec

 

photos by sophie lattes


MILAN THE SALONE

patricia urquiola #milan2011

Patricia Urquiola is with no doubt the star of the last salone del mobile 2011 in Milan. She was omnipresent, presenting great work for Cassina, Morosso, Kartel and a beautiful glass project called All Ambiq.

 

photo anaelle madec

 

photo sophie lattes

 

 

photo anaelle madec

 

 

 

 



Ans Bakker says :
2011-05-18 06:34:29
Beautifull!